Yahweh

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Yahweh

(yä`wĕ), modern reconstruction of YHWH, the ancient Hebrew ineffable name for GodGod,
divinity of the three great monotheistic religions, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as many other world religions. See also religion and articles on individual religions. Names for God

In the Old Testament various names for God are used.
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. Other forms are Jah, Jahve, Jahveh, Jahweh, Jehovah, Yahve, Yahveh, and Yahwe.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Yahweh

 

(also Yahveh, Jehovah), the name for god in Judaism. The name “Yahweh” was formed from the tetragrammaton YHWH, whose precise pronunciation is not known. Inasmuch as uttering the name was taboo, the tetragrammaton served as an ideogram for the word “Lord” (rendered in Greek as kyrios). The Masoretes vowelized the tetragrammaton to “Jehovah,” the name adopted by Christian theologians in the 14th century. According to its grammatical structure, the tetragrammaton, which is derived from the Hebrew verbal root hyh (“to be”), can mean either “eternally existing” or “creator of all that exists.” The exact meaning is debatable.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Yahweh

reconstruction of YHWH, ancient Hebrew name for God. [Heb. Lang.: NCE, 3019]
See: God
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Yahweh

, Jahweh, Yahveh, Jahveh
Old Testament a vocalization of the Tetragrammaton, used esp by Christian theologians
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
We already encounter such a situation in the old Testament, where the stories of creation resort to a demythologization of the sacred cosmology of the Babylonians; then, the announcement of "the name of Jahveh" destabilizes the old representations of the divine at the Baal's people; also, in the New Testament we deal with a demythologization of the eschatological representations when John says that the future has already started in Jesus Christ.
The dynamic in the divine word is not peculiar to the word, but it is characteristic of everything divine and of Jahveh himself....