Jamaicans


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Jamaicans

 

a nation (natsiia, nation in the historical sense) and the indigenous population of Jamaica. According to a 1977 estimate, there are 2 million Jamaicans. The overwhelming majority are Negroes and mulattoes; the former are descended from the Africans brought to the island as slaves, primarily between the 16th and early 19th centuries. After the mid-19th century, workers were brought from India and China to labor on the plantations; their descendants have for the most part intermingled with the Negro population. The majority of Jamaicans speak a creolized form of English. Most religious believers are Protestants, chiefly Anglicans or Baptists; many elements of African religions have been preserved.

References in periodicals archive ?
Vosa Rivers, an international events promoter and producer responsible for the acclaimed South African play Sarafina, has developed a strategic alliance to promote cultural events in Jamaica and export Jamaican talent to the U.S.
Powell's A Small Gathering of Bones makes it clear that homosexuality is a viable subculture in Jamaican society.
They will all be cheered by many of the 60,000 Jamaicans who live in Birmingham, making the city a real home from home for the team.
There is urgent need for a concerted groundswell effort by all Jamaicans to salvage the dignity and respect of some of our downtrodden and marginalized men."
Last year, the Daily Mirror's chief crime correspondent Jeff Edwards exposed the shocking cargo in deadly drugs smuggled to Britain every day by Jamaicans.
The ministry said it viewed the decision with 'regret' but agreed it would be beneficial to cut the number of Jamaicans rejected before arrival.
diplomats, mill managers insisted that "Haitian labor is unquestionably superior to any other."(76) Indeed, the sugar mogul Manuel Rionda wrote: "I do not like Jamaicans. The best foreign laborers for cutting cane are the Haitians."(77) "Haitians are the best," his brother Salvador, on-site manager of the Manati plantation in northeastern Camaguey, concurred.(78) By the mid 1920s, sugar administrators had found their preferred source of plantation labor.
In 1948, on request from the British government, Jamaicans and Caribbean peoples arrived in the UK to rebuild the country's economy, following the Second World War.
The efforts of the Jamaican unionists, combined with the unifying force of an underlying Afro-Caribbean tradition which the Jamaicans and St.
Cliff: That was the first piece, and that led me to "Obsolete Geography."(2) For a long time I hadn't thought about what it meant to be a Jamaican, even though I was going back there a lot.
Moments of Cooperation and Incorporation: African American and African Jamaican Connections, 1782-1996
Donald, a professor of economics at Stanford University, California, wrote, "My dear departed grandmothers (whose extraordinary legacy I described in a recent essay on this website), as well as my deceased parents, must be turning in their grave right now to see their family's name, reputation and proud Jamaican identity being connected, in any way, jokingly or not with the fraudulent stereotype of a pot-smoking joy seeker and in the pursuit of identity politics."