Cabell, James Branch

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Cabell, James Branch

(1879–1958) writer; born in Richmond, Va. After graduating from the College of William and Mary, he worked as a journalist and as a coal miner. With his first novel, The Eagle's Shadow (1904), this Virginia-based author launched a prolific literary career producing works ranging from historical short stories to Virginia genealogy. He was known chiefly for his polished romances set in a mythical French province, Poictesme (18 vols. 1913–29), intended as allegories of the modern world. The best known of the series, Jurgen (1919), was originally suppressed as being immoral. Highly admired by literary types in his day, Cabell's work failed to speak to later generations.
References in periodicals archive ?
The notable exception is James Branch Cabell who considered the novel overrated (45-46).
"The Heir of James Branch Cabell: The Biography of the Life of the Biography of the Life of Manuel (A Comedy of Inheritances)" [sic].
Stribling, and Elizabeth Madox Roberts, who impressed him, and Ellen Glasgow and James Branch Cabell, who did not ("God, how I hate that Richmond-Charleston school!").
Sandburg's book included the poems "Chicago" and "I Am the People, the Mob." Other books published this year included The Certain Hour by James Branch Cabell, short stories; The Rising Tide by Margaret Deland, a novel dealing with women's suffrage; Life and Gabriella by Ellen Glasgow, a novel; A Heap o' Livin' by Edgar Guest, verse; The Man Against the Sky by Edwin Arlington Robinson, poetry; Seventeen by Booth Tarkington, a novel; The Mysterious Stranger, a posthumous tale by Mark Twain; Xingu and Other Stories by Edith Wharton; and When a Man's a Man by Harold Bell Wright, a novel.
Born in 1879 in the heart of Richmond, one-time capital of the Confederate States of America, James Branch Cabell lived his formative years in a charged ambience.
Richmond has not forgotten him: the James Branch Cabell Library is on the campus of Virginia Commonwealth University there.
As MacDonald continually emphasizes, the key word for the series is Biography; for Manuel, read James Branch Cabell. Completing that monument during the next quarter century, Cabell continued to write in experimental modes about his own life, the emphasis now more emphatically on the life of the mature writer.
Among books published this year was Jurgen, A Comedy of Justice by James Branch Cabell, an excursion through the world of fantasy, allegory, and escape.
This is particularly disappointing since Rowe devotes over twice the space in the same chapter to a lesser writer, James Branch Cabell, who, she claims, countered Rawlings's realism with "absolute fantasy" (p.
Other books published this year included The King Was in His Counting House by James Branch Cabell, a novel; The Unvanquished by William Faulkner; the Selected Poems of John Gould Fletcher; The Fifth Column by Ernest Hemingway, a play dealing with the Spanish Civil War whose title came to mean a body of agents working secretly within a country to overthrow it; The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers; The Prodigal Parents by Sinclair Lewis; Land of the Free, poetry by Archibald MacLeish; Black Is My Truelove's Hair by Elizabeth Madox Roberts, a novel; and Uncle Tom's Children by Richard Wright, a collection of stories that heralded Wright's arrival as a writer.
It raised a censorship issue reminiscent of the one inspired by James Branch Cabell's 1919 novel Jurgen.