Jamestown, Virginia

(redirected from Jamestown Island)

Jamestown, Virginia

first permanent English settlement in New World (1607). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 255]
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The fishing is great and the view of the Pell Bridge and Jamestown Island is fantastic.
Oyster harvesting by the colonists was typically done opportunistically by hand at low tide from intertidal oyster populations within the region between Jamestown Island and Hog Island/Mulberry Point (Fig.
Maximum dry season salinities of 8-10.9 ppt were recorded at Jamestown Island (Fig.
Thus, salinities in the upper James River during the 1606 to 1612 drought would have been higher than modern salinities with the river reach from Hog Island to Jamestown Island (Fig.
Nearly a year later (May 14, 1607), the travelers landed on what is now Jamestown Island off the coast of Virginia.
She visited Williamsburg following her address and toured the Historic Jamestowne archaeological site on Jamestown Island. In 1607, 104 English explorers founded the first English settlement in the New World at Jamestown.
Three days and nights of music, theatre and firework displays on Jamestown Island will salute an area the explorers found almost by accident, when foul weather drove their ships inland from Chesapeake Bay in search of shelter.
Our previous understanding that settlements like Plymouth Rock, Jamestown Island, and Roanoke colony were isolated from each other is changing, according to Andrew S.
Principal battles: Brandywine (Pennsylvania) (1777); Barren Hill (near Norristown, Pennsylvania), Monmouth (near Freehold, New Jersey) (1778); Green Spring (near Jamestown Island), Yorktown (1781).
Among the places where such creative work is being done are Jamestown Island, the early English settlement in Virginia that's part of Colonial National Historical Park, and the site of the Sand Creek Massacre in Colorado, where more than 150 American Indians were killed by Colorado volunteers, as well as Antietam National Battlefield in Maryland.
Jamestown Island is co-administered by the Park Service, which owns 1,500 acres, and the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities (APVA), which owns 22.5 acres.