János Arany

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Arany, János

 

Born Mar. 2, 1817, in Nagyszalonta; died Oct. 22, 1882, in Budapest. Hungarian poet.

Arany was the son of a peasant. He worked as a schoolteacher and was a clerk on the town council. His epic poem Toldi brought him recognition and the friendship of M. Vörösmárty and S. Petöfi. He took part in the Hungarian Revolution of 1848–49 and wrote the popular songs “Song of the National Guardsman” and “What We Do.” In 1857, Arany wrote the angry patriotic ballad “Welsh Bards.” He was also the author of historical ballads (such as “László V”), epic poems (Toldi, 1846; Toldi’s Eve, 1848; and Toldi’s Love, 1878), narrative poems (such as Kevehaza), satirical poems (such as The Lost Constitution); and lyrical and philosophical poetry.

WORKS

Összes munkái, vols. 1–12. Budapest, 1900.
Összes kolte ményei, [vols. 1–3. Budapest,] 1955.
In Russian translation:
Izbrannoe. Moscow, 1960. [Foreword by E. Malykhina.]
Ballady. Budapest, [1962].

REFERENCES

Tri velikikh vengerskikh poeta. Budapest, 1952.
Levik, V. “Poeziia la. Arania.” Inostrannaia literatura, 1961, no. 12.
Klaniczai, T., J. Sauder, and M. Szabolesi. Kratkaia istoriia vengerskoi literatury XI-XX vv. Budapest, 1962. (Translated from Hungarian.)
Riedl, F. Arany János. Budapest, 1957.
Keresztury, D. “S mi vagyok én . . .”: Arany János’ 1817–56. Budapest, 1967.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Janos Arany's poem based on the myth called The Bards of Wales is taught to every Hungarian child, who learns it by heart.
Every Hungarian child is taught to recite by heart a poem based on the legend called The Bards of Wales by Janos Arany, one of the country's best known poets.
The Hungarian Cultural Centre in London is organising the show to celebrate Hungarian creativity past and present, to honour Janos Arany, and to emphasise the cultural links between Wales and Hungary.
"The court deems them to be a part of the rioting crowd as they took advantage of the lack of control to enter Hungary and the European Union," judge Janos Arany told the court.
Written by Janos Arany in the middle of the 19th Century, the poem 'Bards of Wales' (A walesi bardok) is a vivid description of the alleged slaughter of 500 Welsh druids by King Edward I for refusing to acknowledge his claim on the nation.
The allusion is to the canonical nineteenth-century Hungarian translation of Hamlet by poet Janos Arany, where in act 1 Hamlet meets his fathers ghost: Arany renders the sepulchre's "ponderous and marble jaws," with a shocking poetic license, as "ponderous marble gums." A marble sarcophagus agape like deaths toothless gums is certainly an image to "make night hideous"; the syntagm has become an emblem of Arany's idiosyncratic transubstantiation of Shakespeare's imagery.
Written by Janos Arany in the middle of the 19th century, the poem Bards of Wales (A walesi bardok), which describes the slaughter of 500 Welsh druids by King Edward I, became a call for Hungarian selfdetermination.
Poet Janos Arany's 19th century ballad tells the tale and is a ingrained into the Hungarian cultural psyche that children and adults alike can recite it on demand, but it is barely known in the country in which it is set.
W HEN Hungarian poet Janos Arany was told, back in 1848, to pen a poem praising the arrival of Austrian Emperor Franz Joseph , who'd just defeated a revolution, he turned to Wales and its bards for inspiration, and to cheat the censor.
Gofynnwyd i'r bardd Janos Arany ysgrifennu darn i glodfori'r Ymerawdwr o Awstria, Franz Joseph, ond oherwydd bod arglwyddi Awstria, yr Habsburgs, newydd drechu Chwyldro Hwngari ym 1848, fe wnaeth Janos Arany y gwrthwyneb.
But Janos Arany's 19th century ballad The Bards of Wales, which tells of the slaughter of 500 Welsh poets at the hands of Edward I is barely known in the country in which it is set.
Janos Arany's 19th century ballad The Bards of Wales has, for 150 years, told of the slaughter of 500 Welsh poets at the hands of Edward I.