January thaw

January thaw

[′jan·yə‚wer·ē ′thȯ]
(climatology)
A period of mild weather popularly supposed to recur each year in late January in New England and other parts of the northeastern United States.
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I am no more lonely than the Mill Brook, or a weathercock, or the north star, or the south wind, or an April shower, or a January thaw, or the first spider in a new house.
It was the first day of the January thaw. The snow lay deep upon the house-tops, but was rapidly dissolving into millions of water-drops, which sparkled downwards through the sunshine, with the noise of a summer shower beneath the eaves.
Water levels were low in the fall, but the October storm and the January thaw helped bring water levels up.
The January thaw period begins around now, and often lasts through Jan.
The January Thaw period begins around this date and often lasts through the 25th.
There was no merciful January thaw. The mourning cloak butterflies that we hoped to see on rare warm days fluttering about and sipping sap from broken cherries, maples, and birches stayed chilled and immobile under their bark blankets.
The painting of the girl walking the dog at the beach is titled "January Thaw, Bluffer's Park, Lake Ontario"
The frigid air and "polar vortex" that affected about 240 million people in the United States and southern Canada will depart during the second half of this week, and a far-reaching January thaw will begin, according to AccuWeather.com.
While it may not be enough for a January thaw, it should be enough to foster the growth of fundamental change inside the warehouse and DC operations of many of today's supply chain visionaries.
Last winter, a January thaw melted the snow cover on a nearby park pond and revealed dozens of ice stars of various sizes.
The January Thaw in Southern Michigan and Wisconsin, 1950-1999.
7 Possible smaller January Thaw sometime between now and January 10.