Janus

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Janus

(jā`nəs), in astronomy, one of the named moons, or natural satellites, of SaturnSaturn,
in astronomy, 6th planet from the sun. Astronomical and Physical Characteristics of Saturn

Saturn's orbit lies between those of Jupiter and Uranus; its mean distance from the sun is c.886 million mi (1.
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. Also known as Saturn X (or S10), Janus is an irregularly shaped (nonspherical) body measuring about 122 mi (196 km) by 119 mi (192 km) by 93 mi (150 km); it orbits Saturn at a mean distance of 94,120 mi (151,472 km), and has equal orbital and rotational periods of 0.6945 earth days. The French astronomer Audouin Dollfus is credited with the discovery of Janus in 1966. However, in 1978, the American astronomers Stephen M. Larson and John W. Fountain determined that there were two moons orbiting Saturn at a distance of about 94,000 mi, and it was not until 1980 that the Voyager 1 space probe provided sufficient data to enable Janus to be distinguished from EpimetheusEpimetheus,
in astronomy, one of the named moons, or natural satellites, of Saturn. Also known as Saturn XI (or S11), Epimetheus is an irregularly shaped (nonspherical) body measuring about 89 mi (144 km) by 67 mi (108 km) by 61 mi (98 km); it orbits Saturn at a mean distance of
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; today it is difficult to say which one Dollfus really discovered. Janus and Epimetheus are co-orbital, that is, they share the same average orbit; about every fourth year—at closest approach—the lower, faster satellite overtakes the other, they exchange angular momentum, and the lower one is boosted into a higher orbit while the higher one drops to the lower orbit. The two moons may have formed from the disruption of a single satellite early in the formation of Saturn's satellite system. Janus's surface is extensively cratered, with several larger than 18 mi (30 km); however, there are few linear features.

Janus

(jā`nəs), in Roman religion, god of beginnings. He was one of the principal Roman gods, the custodian of the universe. The first hour of the day, the first day of the month, the first month of the year (which bears his name) were sacred to him. His chief function was as guardian deity of gates and doors. The gates of his temple in the Roman Forum were closed in time of peace and opened in time of war. Janus was usually represented with two bearded heads placed back to back so that he might look in two directions at the same time. His principal festival was celebrated on the first day of the year.

Janus

(jay -nŭs) A small satellite of Saturn. The name Janus was originally given to a satellite of Saturn discovered in 1966 by the French astronomer Audouin Dollfus, but its existence was not confirmed. The name Janus has since been given to one of the two coorbital satellites discovered in 1980 at approximately the orbital distance given by Dollfus. The other satellite is Epimetheus. Four craters have been named on Janus: Castor, Idas, Lynceus, and Phoibe. See Table 2, backmatter.

Janus

[′jā·nəs]
(astronomy)
A satellite of Saturn which orbits at a mean distance of 151,000 kilometers (94,000 miles) and has an irregular shape with an average diameter of 190 kilometers (120 miles).

bifrons

bifrons
Having two fronts or faces looking in opposite directions, as a double herm.

Janus

(1)
Distributed language with an ask/tell constraint system.

qdjanus is a Janus-to-Prolog compiler for Sicstus Prolog and jc is compiles to C.

["Janus: A Step Towards Distributed Constraint Programming", V. Saraswat <saraswat@parc.xerox.com> et al in Logic Programming: Proc 1990 North Am Conf, S. Debray et al eds, MIT Press 1990].

["Programming in Janus", Saraswat, Kahn, and Levy].

Janus

(2)
W.M. Waite, U Colorado. Intermediate language, claimed as an implementation of UNCOL. Used on CDC 6600.

["Experience with the Universal Intermediate Language Janus", B.K. Haddon et al, Soft Prac & Exp 8(5):601- 616 (Sep 1978)].
References in periodicals archive ?
When phronesis is more amply explained in Book 6, it is presented as concerned with one's own good and Janus-faced toward ethical virtue and toward sophia as happiness (NE 1145a 5-6; Burger, pp.
From the texts of these three thinkers Matthias distills central characteristics of an ever-expanding capitalistic society and how they relate to the luxury hotel: Veblen's critique of "conspicuous consumption" (32) of the leisure class; Simmel's description of Janus-faced capitalistic society--a network of relations that produces both alienation and liberation; Kracauer's evaluation of the hotel lobby as a space devoid of essence and replete with self-referentiality and conscious play.
We can see in this Janus-faced sculpture the founding practitioners of cultural history and political history; history as an art form and history as a science; and, history as an open-ended field of inquiry and history as a controlled and limited subject matter.
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However, it is a Janus-faced symbol of the online habits of students and the traditional objectives of higher education, one of which is to inspire critical thinking in learners rather than multitasking.
His work, a richly detailed study of the Vietnamese bureaucracy in what the French called Tonkin, is Janus-faced.
Nowhere is this Janus-faced comprehension of accelerated history more evident than among those whose literary projects brought them closest to the role of the historian, in particular, Chateaubriand, Michelet, and Tocqueville.
After all, he's best known for his Janus-faced role as war hero/war protester.