jasmine

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jasmine

(jăs`mĭn, jăz–) or

jessamine

(jĕs`əmĭn), any plant of the genus Jasminum of the family Oleaceae (oliveolive,
common name for the Oleaceae, a family of trees and shrubs (including climbing forms) of warm temperate climates and of the Old World tropics, especially Asia and the East Indies.
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 family). The genus, which includes shrubs and clambering plants, is an Old World group, chiefly of tropical and subtropical regions but cultivated elsewhere, outdoors in mild climates and in greenhouses farther north. The blossoms, mostly white or yellow, are usually very fragrant, some being used for scenting tea; the oil obtained from the flowers is utilized in perfumery. The common jasmine ( J. officinale) has white flowers and glossy deciduous leaves. Both names are often given to other plants, such as Cape jasmine (see maddermadder,
common name for the Rubiaceae, a family of chiefly tropical and subtropical trees, shrubs, and herbs, especially abundant in N South America. The family is important economically for several tropical crops, e.g., coffee, quinine, and ipecac, and for many ornamentals, e.g.
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) and Carolina jasmine (see loganialogania
, common name for the Loganiaceae, a family of herbs, shrubs, and trees of warmer climates, including many woody climbing species. Some plants of this family are grown in the United States as ornamentals, and several are sources of medicines and poisons.
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). Jasmine is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Scrophulariales, family Oleaceae.
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jasmine

jasmine

Super-fragrant white flowers are used in tea and sweet dishes. Oval, shiny leaves and tubular, waxy-white flowers. Calming, soothing scent, aphrodisiac, antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, used in China for hepatitis, lowers serum progesterone levels and balance hormones in women. NOTE: “False Jasmine” is in a different species with yellow flowers and is toxic It’s also called jessamine, yellow jessamine, jasmine, Carolina jasmine, evening trumpetflower, gelsemium.

Jasmine

 

in Russian, the name for two genera of ornamental plants.

(1) Garden jasmine, or mock orange (Philadelphus), is a genus of deciduous shrub of the hydrangea family. The leaves are serrate and opposite, ranging from oviform to lanceolate. The flowers have four white or cream petals and grow in racemes. The fruit is a capsule.

Mock orange grows in the underbrush of broad-leaved and mixed broad-leaved and conifer forests and on slopes amid other bushes. Its straight thick shoots are used for pipe stems— chubuki—so the plant is sometimes called chubushnik. There are 71 species in Europe, Asia, and North America and three in the USSR: Caucasian mock orange (P. caucasicus), which grows in the Caucasus; thinleaf mock orange (P. tenuifolius); and Schrenk mock orange (P. schrenkii), found in the Far East. Several other species are cultivated.

(2) True jasmine (Jasminum) is a genus of deciduous or evergreen shrub or vine of the family Oleaceae. The leaves are imparipinnate, ternate, or, less frequently, simple. The blossoms are white, yellow, or reddish, with long narrow trumpets and four to six (or 12) lobes. They are aromatic and appear singly, in corymbs, or in cymes. Jasminum includes approximately 200 species, primarily found in the tropics and subtropics of Asia, Africa, and South America. In the USSR there are three species: common, or poet’s, jasmine (J. officinale), which grows in the Caucasus; J. revolutum, found on the Darvaz Ridge; and J. fruticans, which grows in the Crimea and Caucasus. Essential oil is obtained from the blossoms of the Himalaya evergreen grandiflora jasmine (J. grandiflorum) and from sweet jasmine (J. odortissimum), grown on the island of Madeira. The evergreen vine Arabian jasmine (J. sambac) is a popular house plant.

REFERENCE

Derev’ia i kustarniki SSSR, vols. 3, 5. Moscow-Leningrad, 1954–60.

T. G. LEONOVA

jasmine

(also rose) of Indonesia. [Flower Symbolism: WB, 7: 264]

jasmine

traditional representation of a pleasant nature. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]

jasmine

1. any oleaceous shrub or climbing plant of the tropical and subtropical genus Jasminum, esp J. officinalis: widely cultivated for their white, yellow, or red fragrant flowers, which are used in making perfume and in flavouring tea
2. any of several other shrubs with fragrant flowers, such as the Cape jasmine, yellow jasmine, and frangipani (red jasmine)
3. a light to moderate yellow colour
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