Jean Paul

(redirected from Jean Paul Richter)
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Jean Paul:

see Richter, Johann Paul FriedrichRichter, Johann Paul Friedrich
, pseud. Jean Paul,
1763–1825, German novelist. He studied theology at the Univ. of Leipzig and later taught in that city. His novels combine the idealism of Fichte with the romantic sentimentality of Sturm und Drang.
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Paul, Jean:

see Richter, Johann Paul FriedrichRichter, Johann Paul Friedrich
, pseud. Jean Paul,
1763–1825, German novelist. He studied theology at the Univ. of Leipzig and later taught in that city. His novels combine the idealism of Fichte with the romantic sentimentality of Sturm und Drang.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Jean Paul

 

(pseudonym of Johann Paul Friedrich Richter). Born Mar. 21, 1763, in Wunsiedel; died Nov. 14, 1825, in Bayreuth. German writer. Son of a schoolteacher.

Jean Paul’s first works, notably Greenland Processes (1783), are sharp satires. His short story “The Life of the Very Contented Little Teacher Maria Wuz From Auenthal’’ (1793) and his novel Hesperus (1795) are idylls. In the novel Siebenkds (1796–97), Jean Paul creates a vivid picture of life in feudal Germany at the end of the 18th century. In the philosophical novel Titan (1800–03), the heroes remain abstract figures. In his unfinished novel Walt and Vult, or the Twins (1804–05) sentimental and romantic elements are whimsically interwoven with realism, and in his last novel, The Comet, or Nicholas Marggraf (1820), satirical tendencies again predominate. In his aesthetic treatise Preparatory Study in Aesthetics (1804), the sections on the novel and on humor are particularly interesting. Jean Paul’s treatise on education, Levana; or, the Doctrine of Education (1806), is written in the spirit of the Enlightenment and humanism.

WORKS

Sämtliche Werke: Historisch-kritische Ausgabe, vols. 1–30. Weimar-Berlin, 1927–[64]. (Edition not completed.)
Werke, vols. 1–2. Berlin-Weimar, 1968.
Briefe, vols. 1–5, 7–9. Weimar-Berlin, 1954–64. (Edition not completed.)
In Russian translation:
Antologiia iz Zhan-Pol’ Rikhtera. St. Petersburg, 1844.
Zibenkez. Leningrad, 1937.

REFERENCES

Belinskii, V. G. “Retsenziia naAntologiiu iz Zhan-Pol’ Rikhtera.” Poln. sobr. soch., vol. 8. Moscow, 1955.
Admoni, V. G. “Zhan-Pol’ Rikhter.” In the collection Rannii burzhuaznyi realizm. Leningrad, 1936.
Istoriia nemetskoi literatury, vol. 3. Moscow, 1966.
Miiller, J. Jean-Paul. … Leipzig, 1923.
Berend,E.Jean-Paul-Bibliographie. Stuttgart, 1963.

V. G. ADMONI

Jean Paul

real name Johann Paul Friedrich Richter. 1763--1825, German novelist
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, a perusal of The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci (compiled and edited by Jean Paul Richter, Dover Publications, Vol.
He discusses the origins of Pirandello's 'umorismo', clarifying its Romantic roots, citing Jean Paul Richter as a German pre-Freudian source of inspiration and discussing Theodor Lipps's contribution (and Pirandello's response to Lipps's work in L'umorismo).
Podriamos iniciar por ejemplo, como lo menciono en el libro, con Jean Paul Richter, a partir de ese sueno que tiene sobre la muerte de Dios y seguimos con los romanticos alemanes hasta que se asienta y solidifica en Francia con Gerard de Nerval y mas tarde, con Baudelaire.
As Raquel Asun has shown, Galdos skillfully uses the techniques of point of view outlined in Giner's essay, which the famous educator derived from Jean Paul Richter's Vorschule der Asthetik (1804), in order to generate laughter in response to El amigo Manso.(4) Giner essentially provides a condensed version of Jean Paul's fifth "Programm uber das Lacherliche" [Course on the Ridiculous] to analyze how writers create comic effects and make readers laugh.(5) According to Giner and Richter, the comic arises from a disproportionate relationship or a disjunction between motivation and action, effort and result, what should happen and what actually does happen.
Most critics agree that the aesthetic phenomena of Humor and Romantic irony, as described respectively by Jean Paul Richter and Friedrich Schlegel, are virtually interchangeable.
(6.) Jean Paul Richter maintained that Spain had a more profound sense of the comic than other nations: "Z.B.