Jean de Meun


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Jean de Meun

(zhäN də möN), d. 1305, French poet, also known as Jean Chopinel (or Clopinel) of Meung-sur-Loire. He wrote the second part of the Roman de la RoseRoman de la Rose, Le
, French poem of 22,000 lines in eight-syllable couplets. It is in two parts. The first (4,058 lines) was written (c.1237) by Guillaume de Lorris and was left unfinished. It is an elaborate allegory on the psychology of love, often subtle and charming.
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 and made translations from Latin, including the letters of Abelard to Heloise. Called by some the Voltaire of the Middle Ages, Jean de Meun was a man of encyclopedic knowledge, a fearless thinker, and a satirical writer.

Meun, Jean de:

see Jean de MeunJean de Meun
, d. 1305, French poet, also known as Jean Chopinel (or Clopinel) of Meung-sur-Loire. He wrote the second part of the Roman de la Rose and made translations from Latin, including the letters of Abelard to Heloise.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus Jean Perreal, long known almost exclusively as a French portrait painter of the first quarter of the sixteenth century, is also the author of a significant poem that has long gone unnoticed and has for centuries been falsely ascribed to Jean de Meun or a pseudo-Jean de Meun.
(34) Like Ceriziers, Regnier evoked the classical Greek translation, Jean de Meuns translation, and the pseudo-Thomas Aquinas commentary, and then summarised the Consolatio.
Even the study of love shares this infection, as medieval debates on both Ovid and Jean de Meun's contribution to Le Roman de la Rose illustrate.
By describing Fortune in the familiar terms of feminine self-fashioning and self-gaze, not to mention the preponderant human vice of pride, Jean de Meun thus humanizes the goddess.
They also have a text of Chaucer's Jean de Meun improved on that of V.
Whether this happens as a result of confusion on the part of the illuminator (or person in charge of the overall design of the manuscript), or of his subtle involvement in Jean de Meun's scheme, it is often hard to say.
Again Ovid warned, "She whose breath is tainted should never speak before eating, and she should always stand at a distance from her lover's face."(32) Jean de Meun confirmed the advice to avoid an empty stomach and advised a lady "to keep her mouth away from other people's noses."(33) (Mouths emiting foam, fire, or smoke were downright dangerous.(34))
examines Christine de Pisan's campaign against Jean de Meun and the antifeminist masters of the University of Paris, and then sketches brief portraits of Catherine of Siena and Joan of Arc as seen by their contemporaries.
Chapter 3 shows that the apparently simple hostility of love and knowledge produced by love at first sight is used by poets such as Dante, Jean de Meun, the Pearl-poet, and Chaucer to explore more complex questions about erotic love.
The Riverside Chaucer notes a correspondence with Reason's discourse which opens Jean de Meun's portion of the Roman,(10) but a far closer parallel occurs later in the poem:
In all she wrote 10 volumes in verse, including L'Epistre au Dieu d'amours (written 1399; "Letter to the God of Loves"), in which she defended women against the satire of Jean de Meun in the Roman de la Rose.