Jehoiachin

Jehoiachin

(jēhoi`əkĭn), in the Bible, king of Judah. He was king for a few months (c.598 B.C.) after the death of his father, JehoiakimJehoiakim
, in the Bible, king of Judah, son of Josiah. On Josiah's death his son Jehoahaz became king. However, Pharaoh Neco II dethroned him and set up another of Josiah's sons, Eliakim, who took the name Jehoiakim.
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. He and his court were carried away into exile by Nebuchadnezzar to Babylon and imprisoned. On the death of Nebuchadnezzar he was freed and given honorable treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
The biblical episode relates that after the death of the Babylonian ruler Nebuchadnezzar, his son, Evil-merodach, the new king of Babylon, released Jehoiachin, a former ruler of the vanquished kingdom of Judah, after thirty-six years in prison in Babylon.
(4) He also suggests that the release of Jehoiachin from prison at the end of Kings (II Kgs.
Similarly, does the absence from Judges of any mention of Egypt, Babylonia, and Assyria as oppressors of Israel indicate that one context of the various possibilities for its (layers of) composition may be conveyed by the political disarray described by the Babylonian "Erra Epic" that allowed for the emergence and consolidation of a number of smaller nations; or is that absence simply dictated by the flow of the biblical narrative composed by the royal scribes of the exiled King Jehoiachin (pp.
bring about calamities, such as the exile of Jehoiachin, which led
This was a family of central importance during the reign of Josiah which, apparently, fell out of favor during the reigns of Jehoiakim, Jehoiachin, and Zedekiah.
For the thirty years that they were there (Jehoiachin's exile was in 597 B.C.E.), the exiles strengthened and expanded their communal life.
In this case, it was meant to explain why Matthew named Jeconiah (Jehoiachin) and not his father Jehoiakim as the son of Josiah (cf.
The marginal notes of the Geneva edition explain that the eagle represents the King of Babylon, Nebuchadnezzar, and the highest branch of the cedar represents Jeconiah (variant of Jehoiachin), the King of Israel who had been taken into captivity by Nebuchadnezzar (and, as it turned out, put in prison for thirty-six years).
On the domestic political level, this period saw the last four kings of Judah, Jehoahaz, Jehoiakim, Jehoiachin, and Zedekiah, (1) rise and fall from power in quick progression (II Kgs.
The text for Proper 6 follows a section in which the word of the Lord inspired Ezekiel to "propound a riddle, and speak an allegory to the house of Israel" (17:2) about an eagle (Nebuchadnezzar) who takes the topmost shoot (Jehoiachin) of the cedar (Lebanon) and transplants it--where it becomes a vine that then stretches towards another eagle (the pharaoh, Psammetichus II).
The book of Kings concludes with the release from prison in Babylonia of Jehoiachin, the legitimate claimant to the Davidic throne, and the implicit hope in the restoration of the monarchy.