Jehoshaphat

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Related to Jehosaphat: Valley of Jehoshaphat

Jehoshaphat

(jēhŏsh`əfăt), In the Bible, king of Judah (c.873–849 B.C.), son and successor of AsaAsa
, in the Bible, king of Judah, son and successor of Abijah. He was a good king, zealous in his extirpation of idols. When Baasha of Israel took Ramah (a few miles N of Jerusalem), Asa bought the help of Benhadad of Damascus and recaptured Ramah. His son Jehoshaphat succeeded him.
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 (1.) He continued his father's religious reforms. He was an ally of Ahab, who was king of Israel, and his successors, and he was the first king of Judah to make a treaty with the kingdom of Israel. He was succeeded by his son, JehoramJehoram
or Joram
, in the Bible. 1 Son of Ahab, king of Israel (c.852–841 B.C.), brother and successor of Ahaziah (1.) He enlisted the support of Jehoshaphat of Judah to put down a revolt in Moab.
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 (2.) The Valley of Jehoshaphat, mentioned in the Book of Joel as a place of judgment, has been identified by tradition with the northern extension of the vale of Kidron to the E of Jerusalem.

Jehoshaphat

destroyed idols; adjured men to follow God. [O.T.: II Chronicles 17:3–6; 19:9–11]

Jehoshaphat

Old Testament
1. the king of Judah (?873--?849 bc) (I Kings 22:41--50)
2. the site of Jehovah's apocalyptic judgment upon the nations (Joel 4:14)
References in periodicals archive ?
Hear what he says, how in His Kindness the heavenly Lord has fashioned for us a wash-place near at hand, such as there never was except overseas, yonder by Jehosaphat and by this one here I bring you comfort." (Press, 1985: 47).
"If I were sure to meet my mother again," Proust told Celeste, "in the Valley of Jehosaphat or anywhere else, I would want to die at once."
Jehoshaphat was yet another example: Jehosaphat scattered and overcame the great army of the Ammonites and Moabites through his earnest prayer to God when he declared a day of fasting and prayer in all Judah and alongside the people in the Jerusalem temple bowed down his face to the earth and spoke, 2.
For example, there were apparently no performances of his oratorios The Feast of Darius, Jehosaphat, Judith and Redemption.(29) No performance of Tobit is recorded, and no printed libretto survives; however, at least one rehearsal and/or performance seems to have taken place, since Smith's manuscript exhibits evidence of use as a conducting score.