Jelliffe, Smith Ely

Jelliffe, Smith Ely

(jĕ`lĭf), 1866–1945, American neurologist and psychiatrist, b. New York City, M.D. Columbia, 1889. He was consultant at Manhattan State Hospital and at Kings Park State Hospital. He served as managing editor of the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease and as joint editor of the Psychoanalytic Review and of the Nervous and Mental Disease monograph series, for which he wrote several volumes. He translated foreign works in his field, and with W. A. WhiteWhite, William Alanson,
1870–1937, American psychiatrist, b. Brooklyn, N.Y., studied at Cornell (1885–89) and Long Island Hospital Medical School (M.D., 1891). In 1892 he joined the staff of the Binghampton State Hospital. He was appointed (1903) superintendent of St.
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 wrote Diseases of the Nervous System (6th ed., 1935). He testified for Harry K. Thaw at the latter's trial for the murder (1906) of Stanford WhiteWhite, Stanford,
1853–1906, American architect, b. New York City; son of Richard Grant White. In 1872 he entered the office of Gambrill and Richardson in Boston, at the time when H. H. Richardson was at the peak of his fame.
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Jelliffe, Smith Ely

(1866–1945) neurologist, psychoanalyst, editor, author; born in New York City. After starting out as a civil engineer, he switched to medicine, taking his M.D. in 1889; that same year he cofounded the important Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, becoming sole owner and managing editor (1902–45). Meanwhile, he had also shown an interest in pharmacology, teaching it at the New York College of Pharmacy and editing the Journal of Pharmacology (1897–1901). In 1907 he became a clinical professor of mental diseases at Fordham University Medical School (1907–13); while there he invited Carl Jung for a famous lecture series in 1912. Jelliffe himself began to practice Freudian psychoanalysis, eventually earning the sobriquet, "father of psychosomatic medicine." His greatest influence, however, probably came from his work as an editor and as coauthor of Diseases of the Nervous System (6 editions, 1915–35).
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.