Jenney, William Le Baron

Jenney, William Le Baron,

1832–1907, American engineer and architect, b. Fairhaven, Mass. He studied at Harvard Scientific School and the École des Beaux-Arts. Later he learned engineering, constructed a railroad in Panama before the Civil War, and was chief engineer on General Sherman's staff in Georgia. The Home Insurance Building, 10 stories high, which he designed and built in Chicago (1883; since demolished), was the first in which both the floors and the exterior masonry walls were borne by a skeleton framework of metal and has come to be known as the first skyscraper.

Jenney, William Le Baron

(1832–1907)
American architect who studied in Paris, France; set up an office in Chicago, IL. He was the first to use structural steel in a building for columns and girders. They were prototype skyscrapers. He taught Sullivan, Holabird, Roche, and Burnham in the practice of constructing tall buildings.

Jenney, William Le Baron

(1832–1907) architect and engineer; born in Fairhaven, Mass. He founded the Chicago school of architecture, pioneering the development of steel-frame construction in prototype skyscrapers like the Home Insurance Building (1884–85) and training among others Louis Sullivan and Daniel Burnham.