Jephthah


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Jephthah

(jĕf`thə), in the Book of Judges, a Hebrew raider, son of Gilead and a judge of Israel. He vowed if victorious over the Ammonites to sacrifice the first of his household to meet him on his return. His daughter was the price of this vow. He also masterminded a slaughter of neighboring Ephraimites. Jephthah is also mentioned in the New Testament book of Hebrews.
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Jephthah

routed the Ammonites to save Israelites. [O.T.: Judges 11:32]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Jephthah

Old Testament a judge of Israel, who sacrificed his daughter in fulfilment of a vow (Judges 11:12--40)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The story of Jephthah and his daughter has elements of drama, starting with the difficult conditions of his early life as the son of a prostitute/concubine.
The major instances of fraternal violence identified here, with presumed primary cause are: (1) the Golden Calf [religious zealousness], (2) Korah [individual rivalry], (3) Peor [religious zealousness], (4) Jephthah [economic inter-tribal rivalry], (5) Gibeah [inter-tribal juridical jurisdiction], (6) David versus Ish-bosheth [individual and tribal rivalry], (7) David versus Absalom [individual rivalry], (8) Abijah versus Jeroboam [inter-kingdom warfare], (9) Baasha versus Asa [inter-kingdom warfare], (10) Jehoash versus Amaziah [inter-kingdom warfare], (11) Pekah versus Ahaz [inter-kingdom warfare/regional power struggle].
Joseph Telushkin, who considered Jephthah a murderer, explained his position thus:
On the contrary, Sorma was able to present more conformist plays such as Georges Ohnet's The Iron Master (15 November 1900) or The Daughter of Jephthah (1886) by Felice Cavallotti (the latter seems to have been performed in Greece, then, for the first time, 10, 16 November 1900).
The liberating figures of Moses and Miriam find more troubling counterparts in Isaac and Jephthah's daughter as Eichler-Levine interrogates the biblical trope of the sacrificial child.
This attempted transformation of narcissism may be related to classical and biblical mythological allusions involving the tragic objectification of female figures in the service of masculine self-idealization, for example Jephthah's daughter, beloved only child in Judges 11, tragically sacrificed by her father because he has promised God to offer up the first thing that emerges from his door in exchange for military victory over his enemies.
"Jephthah's Daughter" is described as the composer's only concert aria.
In "Jiftachs Tochter," Gross maintains that Judges 11:29-40 presents Jephthah's daughter as self-confident, fully aware of her father's predicament, and willing and able to choose freely the fate she suffers.
Jephthah was willing to sacrifice his wife's or daughter.
Although the novel begins with an account of how Clare came to Lacewood in the 1880s, as part of a brief opening exposition about the town itself, the rest of the history proceeds chronologically, from when Jephthah Clare comes to America in 1802 until the turn of the millennium.
Still, to see no reference to Joshua (especially, for example, the battle at Ai), or of the "sacrifice" of Jephthah's daughter (i.e., reflecting, as it does, the intersection of gender with mimetic violence--only Alan Segal comments on this), seemed to me curious gaps.
The heavens, too, are insatiable in demanding sacrifices, including humans and, as we see in the Old Testament, even one's own child as in the story of the near-sacrifice of Abraham's son Isaac (and, in some accounts, the actual sacrifice of his daughter Jephthah).