Jeremiad


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Jeremiad

 

(from the name of the Biblical prophet Jeremiah, who lamented the fall of Jerusalem), a bitter complaint, a lamentation, a mournful, sorrowful song. The word “jeremiad” is sometimes used in an ironic sense.

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The understanding of republicans' mission in the Jeremiad had consequences in the ways republicans from Argentina understood themselves and their initial positive attitudes toward indians.
That Barbauld's generic trespass sets the stage for Percy Shelley's equally as radical, but much more condensed, "England 1819" lets Cox draw parallels between the tragic jeremiad, prophecy, and early forms of science fiction.
Several metal concerts are scheduled in the Sawy Culture Wheel and the Rabawet Theatre and Jeremiad was released; such are the latest signs the metal scene is coming back to life.
Now the American Jeremiad is not what most people find particularly engaging, I grant you.
But the value in that section of the book is in the description of Reagan's use of religious language to create a jeremiad with an upbeat.
The spiritual lyrics end with a call to witness, which is the legacy of the jeremiad that promises the new covenant in the messiah.
Baldwin does not deliver a jeremiad to return citizens to first principles or a founding 'event'; rather, he tells a story of black creativity in the face of white domination and its disavowal" (140).
Sacvan Bercovitch suggests that in the jeremiad "theology was wedded to politics and politics to the progress of the kingdom of God" (xiv).
You'd never know from the Levin jeremiad that these are legal -- not policy -- documents.
The uniformity of their lamentations is impressive-the Bulgarian mind seems to come with this jeremiad already built in.
Keywords: African-American Jeremiad, American Jeremiad, Anti-Colonization Jeremiad, Black Women Jeremiah, Ethiopianist Rhetoric
Marsh offers a thoughtful, well-written jeremiad that ultimately calls us to a season of reflection and repentance, so that we can rededicate ourselves to being the "peculiar people" of Christ.