Jeremiad


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Jeremiad

 

(from the name of the Biblical prophet Jeremiah, who lamented the fall of Jerusalem), a bitter complaint, a lamentation, a mournful, sorrowful song. The word “jeremiad” is sometimes used in an ironic sense.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Her use of the jeremiad is very closely related to how many modern
The dynamics of the jeremiad move from rebuke to reform, from communal taint to communal repristinization.
In her dual emphases on the resilience of natural systems and of us, their alterers, she is onto something that lies beyond the "unpleasant, guilt-inducing scold about our reprehensible environmentalists' profligacy" that she associates with environmental jeremiads. Jerermiad is a telling term, with its Puritan associations, and Muir clearly savors its Yankee particularity, as she does her own family's roles in New England's history.
There the comparison ends, however, for unlike Miller, who never claimed that his book was more than a collection of essays, separate pieces of an early American quilt, Bercovitch offers what he believes whole cloth, to dress the "American" as completely as he did in such book-length works as The Puritan Origins of the American Self (1975) or The American Jeremiad.
Like most redemptive dramas, the American jeremiad generates tension and urgency (or "anxiety") associated with guilt (p.
And I don't think of the fake variety: for Bridle isn't just a purveyor of the armchair jeremiad, who sits there blowing filter bubbles -- he does fieldwork as well on our hideous and looming fate.
Johnson rightly sees the power and ironies of Obama's "striking theological and political reorientation of the jeremiad," a reorientation where inspirational lamentation and "an unyielding faith" would promote social change in the service of justice that corrects social harms rather than tout American exceptionalism.
The song crescendoes into a jeremiad against hostile rhetoric toward refugees, including people like his relatives who make other lives possible.
In our October 2016 issue, Helen Shaw wrote a sweeping but nuanced jeremiad about the state of the American play and the pluses and minuses of its increased academicization.
In seeming opposition to the traditional Catholic understanding of time inscribed in the Spanish Monarchy, time in the Republican Catholic sermons was enacted through the Jeremiad. As a discursive form, the Jeremiad (Bercovitch, 1978) has its origins in the Old Testament prophets.
In six paired chapters, Romanticism in the Shadow of War demonstrates the emergence and transformation of three hybrid subgenres: the melodrama, the satiric jeremiad, and the Italianate romance.
One remembers (nostalgically, alas) Judith Butler's suggestion that the potentially offensive sign on the gay male restaurateur's door, "She's overworked and needs a rest" (167), was an occasion to think about how no constituency owns the feminine (not the female, the feminine); or how the offence taken by the theologian who hated jello-esque religious kitsch became for Eve Sedgwick an analysis of the queerly reparative vestiges of sentimentality (Epistemology 142-43); or, more recently, Lee Edelman's suggestion that we respond to Christians' jeremiad that queers are destroying the world not with "self-righteous bromides of liberal pluralism" (16) but with an analysis of how such jeremiads might, or even should, be true.