Jeremiad

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Jeremiad

 

(from the name of the Biblical prophet Jeremiah, who lamented the fall of Jerusalem), a bitter complaint, a lamentation, a mournful, sorrowful song. The word “jeremiad” is sometimes used in an ironic sense.

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Secondly, I will briefly discuss the differences between the nineteenth-century jeremiad and its Puritan predecessors.
It identifies Stewart's rhetoric as jeremiads that linked religious, moral, political and social lamentations of the American democratic system and called her audiences to aid in the desensitizing of slavery and America prejudice.
In its simplest form, the jeremiad is a type of literature that
The religious language of the war, in particular, was nearly always the language of the jeremiad, in which God guarantees victory to the righteous and ruin to their enemies, and battlefield success is linked to piety and failure to apostasy.
He preached the mother of all jeremiads, the most famous sermon in our history, "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" (1741), using the same verse of Isaiah that Julia Ward Howe would in "The Battle Hymn of the Republic": "I will tread them in mine anger, and will trample them in my fury, and their blood shall be sprinkled upon my garments, and I will stain all my raiment.
Eminem may fit into that tradition of lyrical catharsis and boulevard jeremiads, but he certainly didn't create it.
To use a specific example, in "Sinners in the Hands of An Angry God," one of the best-known Puritan jeremiads, Jonathan Edwards uses a strategy very similar to Wheatley's.
Are your company's employees bombarded with e-mail jeremiads and prophecies of online Armageddon?
In fact the only time the prose develops any consistency of 'edge' is in the repeated jeremiads against contemporary society.
David Noble's battle to `Defend the Sacred Space' of the classroom: Jeremiads against online education attract followers; critics say he's an ill-informed Luddite.
After he broke with the movement, Malcolm X's jeremiads retained a small portion of their ecclesiastical focus, but otherwise became almost purely political addresses predicting the end of white world supremacy via social revolution.
Through such jeremiads against outsiders, mainstream culture might arguably be seen as revealing its own inner doubts about the emotional sacrifices its lifestyle entailed.