Jeremiad

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Jeremiad

 

(from the name of the Biblical prophet Jeremiah, who lamented the fall of Jerusalem), a bitter complaint, a lamentation, a mournful, sorrowful song. The word “jeremiad” is sometimes used in an ironic sense.

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Now the American Jeremiad is not what most people find particularly engaging, I grant you.
According to Bercovitch, the jeremiads (at least those found in the Old Testament and those issuing from Puritan writers) were "corrective, not destructive .
It identifies Stewart's rhetoric as jeremiads that linked religious, moral, political and social lamentations of the American democratic system and called her audiences to aid in the desensitizing of slavery and America prejudice.
In its simplest form, the jeremiad is a type of literature that
The religious language of the war, in particular, was nearly always the language of the jeremiad, in which God guarantees victory to the righteous and ruin to their enemies, and battlefield success is linked to piety and failure to apostasy.
While Rael at times takes a stab as such assessment, as when he claims "black jeremiads served to unite African Americans in the common cause of moral elevation," (175) ultimately such assertions lack enough evidence to carry the point.
Graft assembles other quotations in the same vein, and goes on to add, wryly, "The funny thing, of course, is that those jeremiads were right.
No doubt Johnston's publisher wanted to capture a slice of the booming market in political jeremiads.
Those sermon, called jeremiads, allowed preachers to take on the mantle of the Old Testament prophet Jeremiah.
His jeremiads might better be issued to his mirror.
He preached the mother of all jeremiads, the most famous sermon in our history, "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" (1741), using the same verse of Isaiah that Julia Ward Howe would in "The Battle Hymn of the Republic": "I will tread them in mine anger, and will trample them in my fury, and their blood shall be sprinkled upon my garments, and I will stain all my raiment.
Eminem may fit into that tradition of lyrical catharsis and boulevard jeremiads, but he certainly didn't create it.