Jerome, William Travers

Jerome, William Travers,

1859–1934, American lawyer, b. New York City. Prominent in the cause of reform, he served (1894–95) on the Lexow commission to investigate political corruption and managed (1894) the successful campaign of William L. Strong for reform mayor of New York City. He helped frame the legislation that created the court of special sessions (1894) and became (1895) justice of that court. As district attorney (1901–9) of New York co., Jerome led a continuous and independent campaign against crime and political corruption. Frequently he led surprise raids in person, notably the one against the gambling house of Richard CanfieldCanfield, Richard Albert,
1855–1914, American gambler, b. New Bedford, Mass. A well-known gambling operator in Providence, R.I., Canfield went in the 1880s to New York, where his gambling establishment became famous. It was closed in 1904 largely through the efforts of W.
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. Jerome was the prosecutor in the trial of Harry K. Thaw for the murder of Stanford WhiteWhite, Stanford,
1853–1906, American architect, b. New York City; son of Richard Grant White. In 1872 he entered the office of Gambrill and Richardson in Boston, at the time when H. H. Richardson was at the peak of his fame.
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.

Bibliography

See biography by R. O'Connor (1963).

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