Jevons effect

Jevons effect

[′jev·ənz i‚fekt]
(meteorology)
The effect upon the measurement of rainfall caused by the presence of the rain gage; in 1861 W.S. Jevons pointed out that the rain gage causes a disturbance in airflow past it, and this carries part of the rain past the gage which would normally be captured.
References in periodicals archive ?
Woudhuysen, Professor of Forecasting and Innovation will highlight the Jevons Paradox, otherwise known as the rebound effect, and how it should influence any government initiatives before we "waste any more time trying to cut energy consumption." The Jevons Paradox, Jevons effect, or 'rebound' effect, is the idea - first proposed in 1865 by the English economist William Stanley Jevons - that increases in the efficiency with which a fuel is used tend to increase, not decrease, the rate at which that fuel is consumed.