Jewess


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Jewess

Offensive a Jewish girl or woman
References in classic literature ?
By the body of St Mark, my prince of supplies, with his lovely Jewess, shall have a place in the gallery!
The little Jewess, he had heard the Fraulein call Rachel.
"All my mother's family come from Lithuania, all my father's family come from Ukraine and I was brought up an Orthodox Jewess.
Caledonia opens in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1696 and tells of the uncertain fate of 15 year-old Jewess Anna Issac, who is slated to marry a Frenchman that her spiteful brother has selected for her.
My protagonist is a feisty Jewess who hails from Childwall but works at a sex shop in London, unbeknownst to her family up in the mists of Merseyside.
The most renowned among them was Marie Musaeus Higgins, a German Jewess educationalist, in whose memory Musaeus College Colombo was named.
As a wee Jewess I was superenvious of the kids who got to sit on Santa's lap at the mall; I felt left out when Christmas music filled every public space; I wanted to see blue and white sparkly lights mixed with the red and green ones.
class="Magazineutilitytextspan xml:lang="EN-GBThe Acts of the Apostles describes the scene: "Some days later Felix came with his wife Drusilla who was a Jewess.
Her exploration is filled with big players such as Mordecai Noah, Isaac Mayer Wise, Rebecca Gratz, and Rose Eytinge, and big plays, such as Sarah, The Jewess; Jack Shepard, or The Life of a Robber; and Ivanhoe.
"Dirty Jewess: A Woman's Courageous Journey to Religious and Political Freedom " is her personal story her courageous journey towards religious and political freedom, all while coming of age in post-Holocaust, communist Czechoslovakia.
Daisy Werthan (Sian Phillips) is an ageing Jewess in a prosperous town in the American South.
Brought to life in the Ukrainian artist Nikolai Kornilovich Pimonenko's painting Zhertva fanatizma (Victim of Fanaticism; 1899), this converted Jewess was inspired by an actual female convert in a shtetl (Yiddish: small town) in the Pale of Jewish Settlement in late imperial Russia who converted to marry her Christian lover and was then tormented by her former coreligionists.