Jewish

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Jewish

1. of, relating to, or characteristic of Jews
2. a less common word for Yiddish
References in periodicals archive ?
As Cohen tellingly points out, what Sherman did in the fall of 1962 when his album My Son, the Folk Singer was released was to make Jewishness a pleasure.
Because Cohn is so close to the white masculine ideal, his Jewishness becomes even more threatening to Jake.
6) Weinstein's historical retelling focuses, instead, on Jews whose assimilation makes them look like Christians to the outside world and who maintain their Jewishness while advancing socially, economically, and professionally as New Christians.
Although Howe tended to associate secular Jewishness, the creed he now adopted, with Polish Jewry between the two world wars, and with the immigrant quarters in America, its history may be traced back to a much earlier time.
These are four great American stories, even when the extent of their Jewishness must remain open for debate.
Bringing together meditations on Jewishness, Israel and diaspora, the divine, love and eros, Amichai's Hebrew-language poetry was equally influenced by Israeli colloquial street-talk and biblical Hebrew.
Much of this work, so densely interwoven with postwar popular culture, might seem frivolous given the place of the Holocaust in Jewish experience and memory; yet by examining the tension between "passing" and ethnic identification, this exhibition inserts Jewishness into a world that attempts to eradicate it.
Woody on Rye: Jewishness in the Films and Plays of Woody Allen.
This essay is an attempt to lay out explicitly the positive side effects my actions have for Judaism, Jewishness, and the Jewish community as a whole and how my work actually is "Jewish.
The cartoon shows secular Israeli intellectuals rejecting the idea of the Jewishness of Israel and at the same time depicts Orthodox Jewish leaders rejecting the same idea.
Ostrer said: "We have shown that Jewishness can be identified through genetic analysis, so the notion of a Jewish people is plausible.
ONE COULD SAY of the Jewishness in Man Ray's work what Theodor Adorno said of it in Gustav Mahler's: "One can no more put one's finger on this element than in any other work of art: It shrinks from identification yet to the whole remains indispensable.