Jewry


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Related to Jewry: Juden

Jewry

1. 
a. Jews collectively
b. the Jewish religion or culture
2. Archaic (sometimes found in street names in England) a quarter of a town inhabited by Jews
3. Archaic the land of Judaea
References in periodicals archive ?
In turn, the members of the delegation of the National Coalition Supporting Eurasian Jewry praised the efforts of the Government to prevent the incitement of hatred on national soil, its rapid response to provocations against civil accord in the country and pledged the support for changes in the socio-political and economic spheres being carried out in Ukraine.
Hence American Jewry has distanced itself from the concept, as Eisen himself noted in the 1991 American Jewish Year Book.
Burla made a bold, potentially explosive and certainly non-conformist statement, arguing against Israel's long-time norm of appeals for financial donations from Diaspora Jewry.
Despite being disparaged by the local Jewry, the Web site has angered some elements of society.
Jewry later also appeared in Billy Fury's movie, Play It Cool.
Horrific oppression of Jews during World War II moved world Jewry to support the establishment of an Israeli nation.
I suspect that it was his two earlier explorations into that subject which provided Feingold with a discerning eye for the interplay of cultural antisemitism, government red tape, flaccid diplomacy, the internecine squabbles among American Jewish organizations, and the regrettable, though still insurmountable, facts of realpolitik, all of which contributed to the failure of American Jewry to convince their President and countrymen to step in before it was too late and rescue Europe's Jews from the Nazis.
in Contemporary Jewry from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Huscroft proposes to overlay the results of recent historical research upon the portraits that Michael Adler, Cecil Roth, and Henry Richardson drew of medieval English Jewry.
4) I want to reflect briefly here on how Shakespeare's Jewry is similarly marked by temporal distance from the present--and in ways that parallel certain contemporary American discourses of world cultures.
Grossman, Professor of Jewish History at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, brings a thoroughgoing expertise in the legal, exegetical, ethical, social, and literary sources of medieval Jewish life to this systematic exposition of what can be surmised about that voiceless female half of medieval Jewry who left virtually no written documents of any kind.
The files are sure to attract the attention of scholars studying the legacy of his successor, Pius XII, who has been criticized for his perceived failure to defend European Jewry from the Nazis.