Jew

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Jew

1. a member of the Semitic people who are notionally descended from the ancient Israelites, are spread throughout the world, and are linked by loose cultural or religious ties
2. a person whose religion is Judaism
References in periodicals archive ?
God sent Moses to the Pharaoh to demand the Jews' freedom from slavery.
And many Gentiles felt the same way about the Jews' special place in God's sight.
They constitute a suicidal abnegation of Jewish identity precisely because of the fact that with all Jews' "flaws and limitations as a people" it is not possible "to consider Judaism without justice.
How many years of history does it take to erase Jewish wandering and the Jews' right to their country?
Her evocation of the cloistered world of the "Deitch-yiden" matrons at lunch in the elegant dining room of Rich's Department Store is a marvelously executed riff, balancing social criticism and human empathy, imagining the German Jews' wish to enjoy the perquisites of their position without being bothered by the turmoil outside their gates.
After these regimes were overthrown, however, many of the Jews' new privileges were rescinded.
In labor Zionism, Shapira notes, the Jews' historical writ established a "primary right: to settle in Palestine, but that "primary right" still had to be redeemed by actual labor on the land.
Now, a team of researchers from California, Israel and Italy has partially exonerated the cerebral delicacy as the cause of the Libyan Jews' high rates of the disease.
Yet what came in from the outside was also made the Jews' own.
She also mentions pairing which seem to demonstrate "a seamless flow "" 'Old' Testament texts to those of the New," as these leave Christians frustrated with Jews' obstinacy for "refusing" Jesus.
We sense, in fact, that secular Jews' resistance to learning about Christianity may, in part, reflect their resistance to their own theological traditions.
4) The following analysis of revolution on Smolensk's Jewish street (a Yiddish term referring to Jews' social world), is a contribution to building a critical historiography of Russian-Jewish politics outside the Pale.