Jingdezhen


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Jingdezhen

(jĭng-do͝o-jŭn) or

Fowliang

(fo͞o`lyäng`), city (1994 est. pop. 294,000), NE Jiangxi prov., China, on the Chang River. It is world famous for its fine porcelain, made since the Han dynasty (202 B.C.–A.D. 220) from the white clay, kaolin, found near Poyang Lake to the west. Coal is mined in the region. The city reached its greatest fame under the Northern Sung dynasty (c.1000), when it supplied porcelain to the royal household. It declined after heavy damage in the Taiping Rebellion. The name sometimes appears as Ching-te-chen.

Jingdezhen

, Fowliang, Fou-liang
a city in SE China, in NE Jiangxi province east of Poyang Lake: famous for its porcelain industry, established in the sixth century. Pop.: 416 000 (2005 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute Jingdezhen 333403, China
Through strengthened cooperation with local museums, especially the Institute of Archaeology of Porcelain of Jingdezhen City this year, the porcelain finally left Jingdezhen for Beijing to be displayed alongside 137 perfect vessels made from the same royal kilns.
The discovery of early Yuan blueandwhite shards from the city of Jingdezhen in 2009 suggests rich new evidence of exchange and communication between China and the Islamic world.
68) In Jingdezhen there is a saying which provides the shortest answer to the cost of fuel: 'One li (60 metres) of kilns cost 10 li (600 metres) of forest.
Ai's 2013 work 'Iron Tree', a six-metre high sculpture ' inspired by the wood sold by street vendors in Jingdezhen, Southern China, stands outside the chapel.
Makers included in the exhibition are Michael Brennand Wood, internationally regarded as one of the most innovative and inspiring artists working in textiles; Felicity Aylieff, whose ceramic work is informed by an artist's residency in Jingdezhen, China, the worldwide centre for porcelain production; and influential quilt artist Pauline Burbridge.
Sunflower Seeds (2010) is composed of 100 million pieces of seed-shaped porcelain that were painted by 1,600 artisans from Jingdezhen.
Thanks to the generous support of the Louise Hawley Stone Charitable Trust Strategic Acquisition Fund, the East Asian Section of World Cultures has recently made a significant purchase of a very fine Ming dynasty Jingdezhen ceramic ware.
A tour of the factory revealed a number of clays to choose from, including porcelain from Jingdezhen (the pre-eminent historical and living centre of Chinese porcelain).
The title translates to "river crab," and it features thousands of porcelain crabs made in China's historic ceramic center, Jingdezhen, arranged in one corner of the museum.
Another long-standing favourite is Takeshi Yasuda, who is originally from Japan but lives partly in the UK and partly in China where he has a second home and workplace at Jingdezhen, an ancient centre of ceramic production.
China's China: Jingdezhen Porcelain and the Production of Art in the Nineteenth Century.