Joan of Kent


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Joan of Kent,

1328–85, English noblewoman; daughter of Edmund of Woodstock, earl of Kent, youngest son of Edward I. She early gained wide note for her beauty and charm, though the appellation Fair Maid of Kent, by which she became known, was probably not contemporary. Her marriage to the earl of Salisbury was annulled on the grounds of a precontract with Sir Thomas Holland, whom she then married. Upon the death of her brother in 1352 she became countess of Kent in her own right. In 1361, after Holland's death, she married Edward the Black Prince, by whom she had two sons, Edward (1365–70) and Richard (later Richard II). In 1378 she was instrumental in halting proceedings against John WyclifWyclif, Wycliffe, Wickliffe, or Wiclif, John
, c.1328–1384, English religious reformer. A Yorkshireman by birth, Wyclif studied and taught theology and philosophy at Oxford.
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, though there is insufficient evidence to determine if she accepted his doctrines. As long as she lived, she was probably the principal influence on her son Richard II.
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Despite the lack of substantial primary sources directly related to Joan of Kent, Goodman is able to draw upon a broad range of peripheral sources to fill out the context and background of her life, the people among whom she lived, and the society in which she dwelt.
The king was a great admirer of the Countess of Salisbury's mother-in-law at the time, which suggested the name to him, or even the Countess herself, Joan of Kent.
The final section, entitled 'Household Matters', begins 'In Bed with Joan of Kent' as W.
THE Black Prince married Joan of Kent. He was owner of Cheylesmore Manor in Coventry.
Richard (son of Edward, Prince of Wales and Joan of Kent): Created Prince of Wales on November 20, 1376, aged nine, at Havering.