Jobs


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Jobs

How to find a job on the Internet

Looking for a job on the Internet is as time intensive as reading the paper, calling all your friends and networking (the human kind); however, it is more convenient and perhaps most efficient. Today, companies want to simplify the process of hiring, and posting job openings on company websites and job search sites is simple, inexpensive and effective.

Resume Format
The most common formats for submitting resumes are Word and PDF. With Word, be sure to keep font selection basic as you are relying on the fonts in the recipient's machine. With PDF, fonts are included in the document, but although your recipient probably has a PDF reader (Adobe Acrobat Reader), you may not have an application that exports to PDF. Otherwise, plain text is used, which is devoid of any layout attributes such as centering, bold, italic and bullets.

Job Search Sites
There are many websites devoted to job listings. While some deal with all kinds of jobs, others are targeted to industry or location. For example, www.overseas.com deals with jobs outside the U.S. To find out which site works best for you, spend some time surfing through their offerings. As most sites allow searches on the latest listings, you can easily go back and see if anything new has been posted.

Be sure to check the employment category with services such as Yahoo!. You will find information on job banks, career planning, resume services, resume banks and more to help you find gainful employment. Monster.com also has resources such as career advice and articles pertaining to job hunting. Following are some of the job sites on the Web. Good luck and happy hunting.

America's Job Bank (Dept. of Labor)
  www.ajb.dni.us

  Aggregator
  www.ziprecruiter.com

  Worldwide
  www.career.com
  www.careerbuilder.com
  www.craigslist.org
  www.iccweb.com

  Overseas
  www.overseas.com

  U.S.
  www.flipdog.com
  www.gadball.com
  www.monster.com
  www.nowhiring.com

  U.S. including advice and tips
  www.careerbuilder.com
  www.careermag.com
  www.careershop.com
  www.jobbankusa.com
  www.net-temps.com

  U.S. (you control who sees resume)
  http://hotjobs.yahoo.com

  U.S. (college students/graduates)
  www.collegegrad.com
  www.jobweb.com
  www.monstertrak.com

  U.S. (technical, professional)
  www.employmentguide.com
  www.kenexa.com
  www.techies.com
  www.dice.com
  www.itcareers.com
  www.mactalent.com
  www.crunchboard.com

  U.S. & Canada (technical, professional)
  www.kforce.com
  www.truecareers.com

  Wall Street Journal listings.
  www.careers.wsj.com

  San Francisco Bay area
  www.bajobs.com
  www.bayareacareers.com
  www.sfgate.com
  www.valleyjobs.com

  Marketing/Pacific Northwest
  www.marcomjobs.com
  www.marcommatch.com

  U.S. Federal job searches
  www.usajobs.opm.gov

  Temporary jobs
  www.net-temps.com

  Resume sources
  www.eresumes.com

job descriptions

Following is a summary of the job titles in this database. In most cases, there is more information under the individual entries.

business analyst
An individual who analyzes the operations of a department or functional unit. See business analyst.

CCO
(Chief Compliance Officer) The executive in charge of regulatory issues. See CCO.

CGO
(Chief Green Officer) The executive in charge of energy efficiency.

CIO
(Chief Information Officer) The executive in charge of information processing. See CIO.

CKO
(Chief Knowledge Officer) The executive in charge of maximizing expertise. See CKO.

client/server analyst
A person responsible for performing analysis and design of local network-based systems. See client/server analyst.

client/server programmer
A person responsible for developing local network-based applications. See client/server programmer.

consultant
A person who acts as an advisor to users or to the technical staff. See consultant.

CTO
(Chief Technical Officer) The executive in charge of the company's technical direction. See CTO.

datacenter manager
A person responsible for the operation of the computer systems in the datacenter. The data entry and data control departments are under this jurisdiction.

datacom analyst
A person responsible for developing and maintaining a data communications network. See datacom analyst.

data entry operator
A person who enters data into the computer via keyboard or other reading or scanning device.

database administrator
A person responsible for the physical design and management of the database and for the evaluation, selection and implementation of the DBMS. See database administrator.

database analyst
A person responsible for analyzing data requirements within an organization and modeling the data and data flows from one department to another. See database analyst.

e-commerce engineer
A person responsible for developing and maintaining e-commerce applications for a company's public website. See e-commerce engineer.

EDI analyst
A person responsible for the implementation of electronic data interchange systems between companies. See EDI analyst.

EDP auditor
A person who performs an EDP audit within an organization. See EDP auditor and EDP audit.

field engineer
A person responsible for hardware installation, maintenance and repair. Formal training is in electronics, although many people have learned on the job.

hardware engineer
A person who designs the electronic structure of a computer. Such individuals have a background in digital circuits.

help desk analyst
A person who provides technical support for any aspect of the information systems department. See help desk analyst.

Internet engineer
A person responsible for developing and maintaining the infrastructure that supports the public website and inhouse intranets. See Internet engineer.

knowledge engineer
A person who translates the knowledge of an expert into the knowledge base of an expert system. See expert system.

librarian
A person who works in the data library. See data library.

mainframe programmer
A person who writes mainframe applications in programming languages such as COBOL, CICS and various 4GLs. See programmer.

mainframe programmer/analyst
A person responsible for the design and programming of a mainframe application. Programming languages typically include COBOL, CICS and 4GLs. See programmer analyst.

mainframe systems analyst
A person responsible for the design of a mainframe application. See systems analyst.

midrange programmer
A person who writes applications in programming languages such as COBOL, RPG and 4GLs, typically for IBM AS/400s. See programmer.

midrange programmer/analyst
A person responsible for the design and programming of a medium-sized business application. Programming languages include COBOL, RPG and 4GLs, typically for IBM AS/400s. See programmer analyst.

MIS director
See CIO.

network administrator
A person who manages a local area communications network (LAN) within an organization. See network administrator.

network engineer
A person who designs, implements and supports LANs and WANs. See network engineer.

operator
A person who operates a computer in a datacenter. See operator.

PC software specialist
A person who manages PC hardware and software. See PC software specialist.

PC technician
A person responsible for the maintenance of desktop computers within an organization. See PC technician.

programmer
A person who writes a computer program. See programmer.

programmer analyst
A person who performs both systems analysis and programming tasks. See programmer analyst.

project leader
A person who heads an information systems project. See project leader.

project manager
A person who keeps track of an information systems project. See project manager.

QA analyst
A person responsible for maintaining software quality within an organization. See QA analyst.

software engineer
A person who designs and programs system-level software (OS, DBMS, etc.). See software engineer.

system administrator
A person who manages a multiuser computer system (server). See system administrator.

systems analyst
The person responsible for the development of an information system. See systems analyst.

systems engineer
A variety of jobs in the industry. It may refer to a system-level programmer or to pre-sales and post-sales programming for a hardware or software vendor. See software engineer.

systems integrator
An individual or organization that builds systems from a variety of diverse components. See systems integrator.

systems programmer
A person who is the technical expert on some or all of the computer's system software (operating systems, networks, DBMSs, etc.) or a person who designs and writes system software. See systems programmer.

technical writer
A person responsible for writing hardware and software documentation. See technical writer.

UI designer/specialist
A person responsible for designing the user interface. See UI designer.

voice analyst
A person responsible for designing telephony systems, including PBXs, interactive voice response (IVR) systems and call centers.

WAN administrator
A person who manages a wide area communications network (WAN). See WAN administrator.

Web designer
A person who creates a website. See Web designer.

Web programmer
A person who writes in any of the Web programming languages. See Web programmer.

Webmaster
A person responsible for the implementation of a website. See Webmaster.


End of job descriptions.

References in classic literature ?
Some superstitious old carpenters, now, would be tied up in the rigging, ere they would do the job. But I'm made of knotty Aroostook hemlock; I don't budge.
I sought odd jobs. I worked days, and half-days, at anything I could get.
Jurgis asked them what they meant by their rights, a question in which he was quite sincere, for he had not any idea of any rights that he had, except the right to hunt for a job, and do as he was told when he got it.
So many men in Oakland were out on strike, or were locked out, or were unable to work because of the dependence of their trades on the other tied-up trade's, that odd jobs at common labor were hard to obtain.
I will say that the job is yours when I smash Hanson.
And that's what he meant by saying I'd done the gladdest job of all--to-day.
'It's not for want of looking after jobs, I am sure,' said Mrs Plornish, lifting up her eyebrows, and searching for a solution of the problem between the bars of the grate; 'nor yet for want of working at them when they are to be got.
"I doubt whether you'll get Job Rowsell to shift before mid-day.
'I know that,' said Job Trotter, turning upon his companion a countenance of deep contrition, and groaning slightly, 'I know that, and that's what it is that preys upon my mind.
"I suppose she WAS trying," admitted Miss Cornelia reluctantly, "but that didn't justify what Job said when she died.
This was the sort of experience we job horses often came in for.
He was only twelve, but that winter he had got the job of sweeping out the Norwegian church and making the fire in it every Sunday morning.