John Jay


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Jay, John,

1745–1829, American statesman, 1st chief justice of the United States, b. New York City, grad. King's College (now Columbia Univ.), 1764. He was admitted (1768) to the bar and for a time was a partner of Robert R. Livingston. His marriage to Sarah, daughter of William Livingston, allied him with that influential family. In pre-Revolutionary activities he reflected the views of the conservative colonial merchant, opposing British actions but not favoring independence. Once the Declaration of Independence was proclaimed, however, he energetically supported the patriot cause. As a delegate to the First and Second Continental Congresses he urged a moderate policy, served on various committees, drafted correspondence, and wrote a famous address to the people of Great Britain. Returning to the provincial congress of New York, he guided the drafting (1777) of the first New York state constitution. Jay was appointed (1777) chief justice of New York but left that post to become (Dec., 1778) president of the Continental Congress. In 1779 he was sent as minister plenipotentiary to Spain, where he secured some financial aid, but failed to win recognition for the colonial cause. He was appointed (1781) one of the commissioners to negotiate peace with Great Britain and joined Benjamin FranklinFranklin, Benjamin,
1706–90, American statesman, printer, scientist, and writer, b. Boston. The only American of the colonial period to earn a European reputation as a natural philosopher, he is best remembered in the United States as a patriot and diplomat.
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 in Paris. Jay declined further diplomatic appointments in Europe and returned to America to find that Congress had appointed him Secretary of Foreign Affairs, a post he held (1784–89) for the duration of the government under the Articles of Confederation. Although he was able to secure minor treaties, he found it impossible under the Articles of Confederation to make progress in the settlement of major disputes with Great Britain and Spain, a situation that caused him to become one of the strongest advocates of a more powerful central government. He contributed five papers to The Federalist, dealing chiefly with the Constitution in relation to foreign affairs. Under the new government Jay became (1789–95) the first chief justice of the United States. He concurred in Justice James Wilson's opinion in Chisholm v. Georgia, which led to the passing of the Eleventh Amendment. When the still-unsettled controversies with Great Britain threatened to involve the United States in war, Jay was drafted for a mission to England in 1794, where he concluded what is known as Jay's TreatyJay's Treaty,
concluded in 1794 between the United States and Great Britain to settle difficulties arising mainly out of violations of the Treaty of Paris of 1783 and to regulate commerce and navigation.
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. After having unsuccessfully opposed George ClintonClinton, George,
c.1686–1761, colonial governor of New York (1743–53), b. England; father of Sir Henry Clinton. He entered (1708) the British navy and rose to the rank of admiral in 1747.
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 for governor of New York in 1792, Jay was elected and served (1795–1801) two terms. He declined reelection and also renomination to the U.S. Supreme Court and retired to his farm at Bedford in Westchester co. for the remaining 28 years of his life.

Bibliography

See H. P. Johnston, ed., Correspondence and Public Papers of John Jay (4 vol., 1890–93, repr. 1970); biographies by G. Pellew (1890, repr. 1980), F. Monaghan (1935, repr. 1972), and D. L. Smith (1968); R. B. Morris, John Jay: The Nation and the Court (1967) and Witnesses at the Creation (1989).

Jay, John

(1745–1829) diplomat, statesman; born in New York City. He practiced law before entering the First Continental Congress (1774). Originally opposed to outright independence, he changed his view after the Declaration of Independence (1776). He wrote New York's first constitution (1777) and served as president of the Second Continental Congress (1778–79) before becoming ambassador to Spain. He was unsuccessful in his attempt to persuade Spain to recognize American independence. In conjunction with Benjamin Franklin and John Adams, he negotiated and signed the Treaty of Paris (1783) which ended the American Revolution. He then served as secretary of foreign affairs (1783–89) and as the first chief justice of the Supreme Court (1789–95). In 1794, he negotiated and signed "Jay's Treaty" with Great Britain. He also served as governor of New York (1795–1801) before retiring to his farm in Bedford, N.Y.
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With the publication of these two excellent volumes, Nuxoll and her colleagues confirm that John Jay's papers are in the right hands.
(5) See FRANK MONAGHAN, JOHN JAY: DEFENDER OF LIBERTY AGAINST KINGS AND PEOPLES, AUTHOR OF THE CONSTITUTION & GOVERNOR OF NEW YORK, PRESIDENT OF THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS, CO-AUTHOR OF THE FEDERALIST, NEGOTIATOR OF THE PEACE OF 1783 & THE JAY TREATY OF 1794, FIRST CHIEF JUSTICE OF THE UNITED STATES (The Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1935); WALTER STAHR, JOHN JAY: FOUNDING FATHER (Bloomsbury Academic, 2005).
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It is not enough to point to the recent John Jay College study that found most of the victims of clergy abuse since 1950 were adolescent boys.
Policemen and Justice Department prosecutors are to be trained by professors from the University of New York's John Jay College of Criminal Justice, reports Diario Libre (Sept.1, 2005).
The Shepards' court-art exhibition on view this past winter at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York consisted of exhaustive, drama-infused studies of famous defendants.
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This worthy book by Segal, an attorney and professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York, is a companion to Making Schools Work, which she co-authored with UCLA business professor William Ouchi.
Efforts by Aaron Burr, John Jay, and Alexander Hamilton led to the end of slavery in New York State, which at the time of the Revolution maintained a slave system more extensive than that in some of the southern states.
Later, Hamilton wrote to John Jay: "In times of such commotion as the present, while the passions of men are worked up to an uncommon pitch, there is great danger of fatal extremes."