John XXII


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John XXII,

1244–1334, pope (1316–34), a Frenchman (b. Cahors) named Jacques Duèse; successor of Clement V. Formerly, he was often called John XXI. He reigned at Avignon. John was celebrated as a canon lawyer under Boniface VIII, whom he supported. After the death of Clement there was a period of more than two years before the conclave could agree. Before John's election a contest had begun for the title of Holy Roman Emperor between Louis IVLouis IV
or Louis the Bavarian,
1287?–1347, Holy Roman emperor (1328–47) and German king (1314–47), duke of Upper Bavaria. After the death of Holy Roman Emperor Henry VII the Luxemburg party among the electors set aside Henry's son, John of Luxemburg,
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 of Bavaria and his rival, Frederick of Austria. John was neutral at first; then in 1323, when Louis had won and became Holy Roman emperor, pope and emperor began a serious quarrel. This was partly provoked by John's extreme claims of authority over the empire and partly by Louis's support of the spiritual Franciscans, whom John XXII condemned for their insistence on evangelical poverty. Louis was assisted by Marsilius of Padua, who in 1324 published his exposition of his theories Defensor pacis, and later by William of Ockham. The emperor invaded Italy and set up (1328) as an antipope Pietro Rainalducci (as Nicholas V). The project was a fiasco, but Louis silenced the papal claims. In John's last years he advanced a theory concerning the vision of God in heaven or the beatific vision; the novelty he proposed (that this vision will begin only after the Last Judgment) was widely denied and scorned by theologians, and John subsequently modified it. He was an excellent administrator and did much efficient reorganizing. He was succeeded by Benedict XII.

John XXII

original name Jacques Du?se. ?1244--1334, pope (1316--34), residing at Avignon; involved in a long conflict with the Holy Roman Emperor Louis IV and opposed the Franciscan Spirituals
References in periodicals archive ?
In later life he was accused of heresy and brought up before the local Franciscan-led Inquisition, and tried as a heretic by Pope John XXII.
It took the form of a letter to Pope John XXII, in Latin, drafted in Arbroath Abbey and sealed by several magnates and nobles.
was transferred to the Franciscan studium in Avignon in 1322 where he lectured in theology and served as an advisor to Pope John XXII.
The Eyes of the Church": William of Ockham and John XXII on the Theologians' Doctrinal Authority, ISABEL IRIBARREN
Shortly after his death, Albert's name was one of three submitted to Pope John XXII for canonization.
What makes Absolute Monarchs a worthwhile read is not simply those occasional dynamic popes--Urban II or Innocent III--or even that bloody sequence of six popes in seven years in the late ninth century, or the plethora of arcane facts (John VIII, the first pope murdered, or John XXII, who founded Chateauneuf-du-Pape), but rather the entire wide-screen sweep of the book.
Pope John XXII heard about the teenager's miraculous escape and had the church built on the place of the stake.
They are finding not just the creature of Pope John XXII, but a philosopher and theologian who held and adeptly defended unique and often controversial positions, and whose impact extended beyond the religious and chronological confines of medieval Christendom.
Rather, Jacopone represented a major component in the papalist formulation of a hierocratic ecclesiology, which itself would be exploited by Pope John XXII against the Spirituals.
The final section of Vereb's narrative is devoted to the interaction of Jaeger and Bea and the all-important letter of Jaeger to Pope John XXII that led to the creation of an ecumenical bureau for the Vatican.
We have arguments from patristic fathers, Pope John XXII, Roberto Bellarmino and his Lutheran opponent Johann Gerhard, Anglican Jeremy Taylor, Pierre Gassendi, and Lodovico Antonio Muratori's contemporary attack.
Superbly organized and a work of impeccable scholarship, Papal Legislation On Sacred Music begins with chapters on the earlier Popes, John XXII and "Docta Sanctorum Patrum", the Council of Trent, and the Medicean Edition of the Chant Books, to church and religious music of the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries, the Ratisbon and Solesmes editions of the Chant Books, the reforms of Pius X, the Vatican Edition of the Chant Books, the "Motu Proprio" of November 22, 1903, and the final chapter "Conclusions".