John of Damascus


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John of Damascus

Saint. ?675--749 ad, Syrian theologian, who defended the veneration of icons and images against the iconoclasts. Feast day: Dec. 4
References in periodicals archive ?
Dionysius the Areopagite referred to the divine energies as processions, principles, determinations, and divine volitions, (37) while John of Damascus wrote in this regard of the divine radiance and activity.
John of Damascus attributes only good to God; he emphasizes that what seems evil might not actually be so.
Already in antiquity, some Christians--Augustine, for example--resisted such popular themes, insisting on the distinction between Christ and the martyrs, while others--Vietricius of Rouen and John of Damascus, for example--verged on polytheism in their enthusiastic celebration of the saintly martyrs.
This interpretation, which John of Damascus may very well have been alluding to, is that in the course of the events leading up to his arrest and crucifixion Jesus was miraculously removed from the scene and someone else was crucified in his place.
It is also deeply Trinitarian, drawing from the tradition of social trinity, going back to John of Damascus (8 CE), and associated today with Juergen Moltmann.
But art of this kind, whether from the eastern or western churches, is distinctively Christian art in the sense defined initially by John of Damascus around 700 and in 843 with the end of the iconoclastic controversy.
John of Damascus said that there is the written word of God and that there is the painted word of God," Sinaites commented.
John of Damascus in his turn dealt with them in the same extensive way during the Iconoclast period.
He, I think rightly, excludes, but curiously does not mention (except for his development of the kanon), the well-known story of the adoption of the seventh-century Saint Kosmas by the father of Saint John of Damascus, which is probably a tenth-century fabrication [see A.
Joseph Koterski, "On the Aristotelian Heritage of John of Damascus," explores the influence of Aristotle on his account of icons.