Brave New World

(redirected from John the Savage)
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Brave New World

Aldous Huxley’s grim picture of the future, where scientific and social developments have turned life into a tragic travesty. [Br. Lit.: Magill I, 79]

Brave New World

picture of world’s condition 600 years from now. [Br. Lit.: Brave New World]
References in periodicals archive ?
As in many Utopian/Dystopian texts, there is an inevitable rebellion, led in this case by only three characters: John the Savage, his ally Helmholtz Watson, and their pathetic tag-along, Bernard Marx.
The Controller avidly reads books he has banned, praises the experiments of people he has exiled, and finds himself impressed with both Helmholtz Watson and John the Savage; the Savage himself finds that his resistance to a techno-future does not mean that he can either reject the existing present or simply return to an idealized past.
A reader can more easily make these associations due to the editors' decision to begin the collection with lengthy excerpts of Chapters 1, 16, and 17 of BNW; it is Chapter 17 which features the climactic discussion between John the Savage and Mustapha Mond, one of the World Controllers:
Surely Mustapha Mond's respect for John the Savage's idealism hardly equals an acceptance of his argument; John winds up committing suicide while Mustapha goes back to his business as a well-read puppet-master.