Johnniac


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Johnniac

(computer)
A mainframe computer based on a design by John von Neuman built at the Institute for Advanced Study, USA. The Johnniac went live in 1953 and was decommissioned in 1966. Its memory consisted of 80 special "Selectron" vacuum tubes, each of which held 256 bits of data.
References in periodicals archive ?
Preceding those portions are chapters covering infrastructural topics: the genesis and growth of RAND and its Computer Sciences Department, with particular attention to key individuals; acquisition of early computing equipment, from the Reeves Electronic Analog Computer in the late 1940s to the JOHNNIAC digital computer in the early 1950s; and expansion over time of RAND's computing facilities at the corporation's campus in Santa Monica, California.
At the elite think tank RAND, the IAS computer was affectionately named the JOHNNIAC.
The Selectron was the electrostatic tube used in the memory of the JOHNNIAC, built at the Rand Corporation.
Men like John McPherson and Wallace Eckert and Cuthbert Hurd and the undersigned were turning out the computers of the 1940s and early 1950s--yes, computers were people in those years--while Aiken was cranking out Bessel functions for the Navy and the academics were waiting for their MANIACs and JOHNNIACs and ORDVACs to operate.