Johnstown Flood


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Johnstown Flood

Pennsylvania city destroyed by flood (May 31, 1889); 2,200 lives lost. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1427]
References in periodicals archive ?
With Ruthless Tide, Al Roker offers a riveting account of the 1889 Johnstown Flood, one of the worst disasters in U.S.
The Johnstown Flood at Bootlegger was gritty garage rock with dirt under its fingernails and fire in its belly.
Herbert Hoover, Jimmy Carter, Benjamin Harrison (the Johnstown Flood), Grover Cleveland, Barack Obama, Gerald Ford, and more.
He mentioned the famous Johnstown Flood of 1889, and Reisman began scouring the Internet for accounts of that well-documented calamity.
He added that the tax rate could have been much higher if the 18% 'Johnstown Flood Tax" (applied currently to the wholesale price of wine in state-owned stores) had been included in the tax calculation.
Even after the Civil War, though, some of the greatest disasters (the Chicago fire of 1871, the Johnstown flood of 1889, the Galveston hurricane of 1900) elicited very little by way of a federal response.
By the time the house was built in 1891, the Red Cross had provided humanitarian relief for 13 disasters, including the historic Johnstown Flood in Pennsylvania, which killed more than 2,000 people in 1889.
However, on May 31, 1889, in a small town in Pennsylvania, something happened that would become the most reported international news event of the year--the Johnstown Flood. If you come from Johnstown, as I do, the first thing someone mentions when you say the name of your hometown is "Oh, the place that had the flood." (It had many, actually, three of them major ones, but the flood of 1889 is known as The Great Flood.)
"With the valley crowding up the way it was," wrote David McCullough in his book, The Johnstown Flood, "the need for lumber and land was growing apace.
The scene would resemble that of Johnstown, Penn., in 1889 when the Clear Fork Dam burst (see "The Johnstown Flood of 1889," Claims Magazine, December, 2007).
While the subtitle of this book is A Novel of the Johnstown Flood, this verse novel is, at its heart, the story of star-crossed lovers.
What odd and solipsistic choices playwright Rebecca Gilman makes in her newest play, "The True History of the Johnstown Flood," a recounting of a horrific, mostly forgotten disaster she uses to contemplate the role of art in depicting disasters.