Diola

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Diola

 

(also Jola, Yola), a people living on the Atlantic coast of southern Senegal (1967 estimate, approximately 250,000 persons), in Gambia (population, 20,000), and Portuguese Guinea (population, more than 15,000). The Diola language belongs to the Atlantic family of languages. The Diola tribes include the Felup (Huluf, Karon), Bayot, Djawat, Filham, and Fuluni. Although most Diolas are Muslims, some have retained their ancient traditional beliefs. There are also small groups of Christians. The chief occupations are farming (millet, rice, and peanuts) and fishing. Opportunities exist for seasonal migratory work on peanut plantations.

REFERENCES

Narody Afriki. Moscow, 1954.
Bernatzik, H. A. Äthiopien des Westens, vols. 1-2. Vienna, 1933.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
These two African languages both belong to the Atlantic North sub-group and are geographically close (both are spoken in Senegal); moreover, Wolof is the major vehicular language spoken by over 80% of the Senegalese population including some of the Jola people. Nevertheless, even though some semantic associations shared by both languages may imply genetic and/or areal features, the semantic maps for each language are really very different.
Zanemvula, Zwelinzima's father and his headmen, created a split between Zwelinzima and the amaMpondomise customs and traditions by taking him away from the Jola people to his uncle, Gcinizibele, for protection.