Joliot-Curie


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Related to Joliot-Curie: Irène Joliot-Curie

Joliot-Curie

(zhôlyō`-kürē`), French scientists who were husband and wife. Frédéric Joliot-Curie (frādārēk`), 1900–1958, formerly Frédéric Joliot, and Irène Joliot-Curie (ērĕn`), 1897–1956, daughter of Pierre and Marie Curie, were married in 1926. Both were assistants at the Radium Institute in Paris, of which Irène, succeeding her mother, was director in 1932. Together the Joliot-Curies continued the work of the Curies on radioactivity. For their artificial production of radioactive substances, in which they bombarded certain elements with alpha particles, they shared the 1935 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. In 1940 they collaborated on research on the chain reaction in nuclear fission. In 1946 they helped to organize the French atomic energy commission, and in the same year Frédéric was appointed chairman of the commission. He was forced to resign in 1950, however, because of his Communist activities, and in 1951 Irène was also dropped from the commission because of her Communist affiliations. In 1947, Irène became a professor and the director of the radium laboratory at the Sorbonne. In 1956, Frédéric was a member of the French Communist party's Central Committee, and in the same year he was appointed to the chair of nuclear physics at the Univ. of Paris.

Joliot-Curie

Jean-Fr?d?ric , 1900--58, and his wife, Ir?ne , 1897--1956, French physicists: shared the Nobel prize for chemistry in 1935 for discovering artificial radioactivity
References in periodicals archive ?
Frederic Joliot-Curie collaborated with his wife Irene in researching the structure of the atom.
35) The following year, Irene and Frederic Joliot-Curie were themselves awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry.
Although no formal archives exist for the women whose lives are discussed except for the better known Marie Curie, Irene Joliot-Curie, and Lise Meitner (subject of the longest essay - 29 pages), the Rayner-Canhams consulted more than 55 archives in 18 countries in preparing this meticulously documented volume (63 pages of notes and references, some as recent as 1996 are provided).
In 1959 he joined the staff of European Laboratory for Particle Physics at CERN in Geneva and in 1984 also became the Joliot-Curie professor at the School of Advanced Studies in Physics and Chemistry, Paris.
The Chemistry Nobelists Name Award Field Year Ernest Rutherford Disintegration of elements and chemistry 1908 of radioactive substances Marie Curie Discovery of radium and 1911 polonium Frederick Soddy Chemistry of radioactive 1921 substances and origin and nature of isotopes Francis Aston Discovery of isotopes of 1922 many elements by mass spectroscopy Harold Urey Discovery of heavy 1934 hydrogen Frederic Joliot & Synthesis of new radio- 1935 Irene Joliot-Curie active elements George de Hevesy Isotopes as tracers in 1943 chemical research Otto Hahn Discovery of atomic 1944 fission Glenn Seaborg & Discoveries of 1951 Edwin McMillan transuranium elements Willard Libby Development of radiocarbon dating 1960