Jorrocks

Jorrocks

irrepressible pseudo-aristocratic cockney huntsman. [Br. Lit.: Jorrock’s Jaunts and Jollies]
See: Hunting
References in classic literature ?
Plato," he said, laying one finger on the first of a row of small dark books, "and Jorrocks next door, which is wrong.
And she thought how she would draw his attention to Edward's passion for Jorrocks, and the enthusiasm which led Christopher to collect moths and butterflies though he was now twenty- two.
The Governor read, not for the first time, the administration reports of one John Jorrocks, M.
Surtees created the hunting hero: the Cockney grocer John Jorrocks, along with several magnificent anti-heroes: Soapey Sponge, Facey Romford and Lucy Glitters.
But in a shocking incident, a small gang of thugs battered drinkers and football fans outside Jorrocks bar, hurled coins and smashed windows.
Subsequently, his free-range of the magazine was curtailed, and his contributions read very differently from the earlier Jorrocks sketches.
Experience won out Marksman Wokingham winner who won two races, aged 18, in 1826 Jorrocks A trailblazer in early Australian racing, won his last win of 65 aged 18 in 1851, although his sole opponent threw his rider and galloped loose before the race Creggmore Boy Won his last race at 17 in 1957 and finished his career in 1962, at 22
Victorian cobbled streets and 16th century buildings throb to the pulse of bars or clubs, some in converted historic buildings, such as the cavernous Standing Order, historic Jorrocks and lively Thomas Leaper.
The containers - which are in the shape of a rotund huntsman - were based on a character called Mr Jorrocks, a comical figure created by author Robert Smith Surtees.
Dating from around 1805, the travelling chariot carriage is thought to have been owned by Robert Smith Surtees who created the famous comedy sporting character Mr Jorrocks.
Encouraged by the popularity of the Sketches, Seymour then devised a series of drawings about a group of Cockney sportsmen to be called the 'Nimrod Club', in honour of the comic tales of Mr Jorrocks the sporting Cockney grocer, whose popular adventures had been described by R.