Acosta, José de

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Acosta, José de

(hōsā` thā äkō`stä), c.1539–1600, Spanish Jesuit missionary to Peru. He wrote a well-known history of the Spanish colonial period, The Natural and Moral History of the Indies (1590; tr. 1604 and 1880, repr. 1970).
References in periodicals archive ?
Let me now turn to the last stop of this story, the commentaries on bezoars by Jose de Acosta and Bernabe Cobo, two Spanish Jesuits who spent most of their life in the New World.
Loathsome," was the adjective chosen by friar Jose de Acosta, who tasted it first in Peru, "having a scum or froth that is very unpleasant to taste.
While Las Casas argued that missionaries must treat indigenous people as human beings before evangelizing them, in Peru the Jesuit Jose de Acosta insisted that evangelization was possible only after Indians had been made into civilized human beings, that is, Europeans (23).
Na segunda metade do seculo XVI, o jesuita espanhol Jose de Acosta desenhou a evolucao historica de uma hierarquia social fundada no trabalho que, na epoca, colocava no mesmo plano dois grupos humanos que para os colonos eram bem distintos:
Wright cites no sources in Spanish and mistakenly accuses Jose de Acosta of "rail[ing] against the notion of mixed-blood, mestizo children growing up to be Catholic priests" (p.
Entries listing Spanish and English editions span Jose de Acosta to La vida de Lazarillo de Tormes.
Natural and Moral History of the Indies by Jose de Acosta, translated by Frances Lopez-Morillas, edited by Jane E.
The idea that the Western Hemisphere was first peopled by a migration of Asians who reached the New World via a land bridge across the Bering Straits was proposed as early as the 16th century by the Jesuit chronicler Padre Jose de Acosta.
Olsen illustrates the importance of Sandoval's Jesuit formation, his reliance on Jose de Acosta, and his conflicts with the authorities of his day.
Jose de Acosta noted in the 1580s that cacao continued to be associated with women, as in New Spain the Spanish men, but even more the Spanish women, were addicted to the "black chocolate".
Chapter 3 is devoted to writers in the Americas who devoted themselves more systematically to describing its nature: above all, Francisco Fernandez de Oviedo, who modeled his work after Pliny, and the Jesuit Jose de Acosta, who adopted an Aristotelian approach in his Natural and Moral History of the Indies.
UPON his return to Spain from Peru, the Jesuit missionary Jose de Acosta published his acclaimed Historia natural y moral de las Indias (1590).