Joseph Dalton Hooker


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Hooker, Joseph Dalton

 

Born June 30, 1817, in Halesworth; died Dec. 10, 1911, in Sunningdale. British botanist. Corresponding member of the St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences (1858). Son of W. J. Hooker.

From 1839 to 1843, Hooker took part in an Antarctic expedition (Australia, New Zealand, Kerguelen, Tierra del Fuego, Falkland Islands), and from 1847 to 1851 he studied the flora of northern India and Nepal. Beginning in 1855 he was assistant director and from 1865 to 1885, director of the Botanical Gardens at Kew (a London suburb). He was president of the Royal Society of London from 1873 to 1878. He worked on C. Darwin’s collections from the Galapagos Islands and was a supporter of Darwin’s theory of evolution; Darwin adduced Hooker’s data on plant geography to prove his theory. Hooker developed evolutionary ideas in botanical geography. He was the author (with G. Bentham) of a review of genera and founder (1893) of an index, still being pub: lished, of all species of seed plants that have been described (Index kewensis).

WORKS

Genera plantarum. . . , vols. 1–3. London, 1863–83. (With G. Bentham.)
The Flora of British India, vols. 1–7. London, 1872–97.

REFERENCES

Turrill, W. B. Pioneer Plant Geography: The Phytogeographical Researches of Sir J. D. Hooker. The Hague, 1953.
Turrill, W. B. J. D. Hooker: Botanist, Explorer and Administrator. London, [1963].

D. V. LEBEDEV

References in periodicals archive ?
Ronald Campbell Gunn (1808-1881) was a prominent figure in early Tasmania, holding many important public appointments, is now better known for his contributions to Australian botany (Blackwood 2012); he sent many specimens to Sir William Hooker (1785-1865) before and after his 1841 appointment as director of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, England, and to his son and successor Dr Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911).
The descriptive part of the name is attributed to Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (born 1817), who was a world famous botanist travelling on the Antarctic expedition of 1839.
Darwin wrote to Joseph Dalton Hooker in 1879, about 20 years after the publication of "On the Origin of Species," that the rapid development of higher plants in recent geological times was "an abominable mystery.
Fascinated by ornithology as a child, the 25 year-old im Thurn was thrilled to be recommended for the museum post in 1877 by the great botanist and explorer Joseph Dalton Hooker because part of his brief was to document British Guiana's flora and fauna.
In his book Darwin's Armada, Iain McCalman (2009) argues that it's more than just coincidence that Charles Darwin, Thomas Henry Huxley, Joseph Dalton Hooker, and Alfred Russel Wallace all undertook extensive ocean voyages, the latter two going on more than one such trek.
Now we may not have had a John James Audubon book to sell, but we did recently sell a book by the most prominent British botanist of the 19th century, Joseph Dalton Hooker.
British botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker also noted the potential for error when using a boiling point thermometer for calculating altitudes, especially at high elevations, stating that when water is brought to a boil in an open vessel, the surface heat loss will distort the uniformity of the water's temperature.
I'll bet half of the nation would cheerfully see you burned at the stake if they knew what you were writing," confides Darwin's closest friend, the botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker (Dominic Cumberbatch).
I'll bet half of the nation CREATION (1hr 58mins) Certificate: Starring: Paul Jennifer Director: Jon Star rating: would cheerfully see you burned at the stake if they knew what you were writing," confides Darwin's closest friend, the botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker (Dominic Cumberbatch).
The first European to pass through, in 1848, and write something (6) about the people and the region was Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (7) but being a biologist his academic grazing grounds did not encompass the fields of local culture and history.
The signed note, written to British botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker around 1879, was found in the loft of a house in Darwin's home town of Shrewsbury.
In London, as director of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, Hooker also edited the first 2 series of Icones Plantarum (volume 1-10, 1837-1854), illustrated with 1000 lithographs of plants from his herbarium, again many made by Fitch; this publication was later continued by his son Joseph Dalton Hooker with a 3rd series (volume 11-20, 1867-1891) and by Daniel Oliver with a 4th series (volume 21-30, 1892-1913).