Krutch, Joseph Wood

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Krutch, Joseph Wood

(kro͝och), 1893–1970, American author, editor, and teacher, b. Knoxville, Tenn., grad. Univ. of Tennessee, 1915, Ph.D. Columbia, 1923. He was on the editorial staff of the Nation (1924–52), and held a professorship at Columbia (1937–53). Highly regarded as a social and literary critic, Krutch's writings include Edgar Allan Poe: A Study in Genius (1926), The Modern Temper (1929), Samuel Johnson (1944), and Henry David Thoreau (1948). After he moved to Arizona, he turned to the study of nature; his books in this field include The Twelve Seasons (1949) and The Voice of the Desert: A Naturalist's Interpretation (1955).

Bibliography

See his autobiography, More Lives than One (1962); A Krutch Omnibus: Forty Years of Social and Literary Criticism (1970); The Best Nature Writings of Joseph Wood Krutch (1970).

Krutch, Joseph Wood

(1893–1970) author, critic, naturalist; born in Knoxville, Tenn. He graduated from the University of Tennessee and received a Ph.D. in English from Columbia University in 1923. He taught at Columbia (1937–52) and published critical studies of Samuel Johnson, Edgar A. Poe, and Henry David Thoreau. His Measure of Man won a National Book Award in 1954. He was drama critic for The Nation from 1924–52. He moved to Tucson, Ariz., for his health in 1952, fell under the spell of the natural environment, and published a number of lyrical works about the life of the desert. Toward the end of his life he wrote and narrated television specials about the Sonora desert, the Grand Canyon, and Baja California.
References in periodicals archive ?
His honors include the Albert Schweitzer Award from the Animal Welfare Institute and the Joseph Wood Krutch medal from the Humane Society of the United States.
For example, Joseph Wood Krutch comments, "Each of [George Kelly's] most striking heroine-victims is understood with a cruel clarity, but none is pardoned and none, be it noted also, is reformed and then rewarded" (65).
The critic Joseph Wood Krutch said Hedda is one of the first fully developed neurotic heroines of literature.
With the wit that spices everything he writes, Joseph Wood Krutch says in The Twelve Seasons that "the most serious charge that can be brought against New England is not Puritanism but February.
As an example of the later writers, Joseph Wood Krutch writes in "God's Hand in the Sky:" ""If what I find in the desert is no example to be imitated, it suggests a metaphor .
Without naming British sources, such as an educated Briton can be expected to command, and what with my interest in the humanities governing my choices, I list incompletely and at random Justice Hand, Anatole France, Aretino, Thomas Paine, Tertullian, Pompidou, Aijaz Ahmad, Tzvetan Todorov, Ovid, Seneca, Eliphas Levi, Robert Mapplethorpe, Star Trek, Adorno, Quentin Tarantino, the Panchatantra, Joseph Wood Krutch, Max Lerner, Gide, Ben Franklin, Aesop, Victor Hugo, Remy de Gourmont, Francis Steegmuller, Ambrose Bierce, La Rochefoucauld, Turgenev, Petrarch, Elbert Hubbard, Unamuno, Stanislaw Lec, Margaret Fuller, Wittgenstein, and on and on.
Ellen Meloy is one of the lesser-known members of a pantheon of writers about the American southwest whose work has been receiving both popular acclaim and critical attention: Edward Abbey, Barbara Kingsolver, Terry Tempest Williams, Simon Ortiz, Joseph Wood Krutch, Mary Austin and Sharman Apt Russell, to name a few.
Baja California is a wonderful example of how much bad roads can do for a country," Joseph Wood Krutch wrote in his classic Sierra Club book, Baja California and the Geography of Hope.
Eliot, Ezra Pound, Joseph Wood Krutch, Henry James, Aldous Wood Huxley, and the writers of the Harlem Renaissance.
Finally, Joseph Wood Krutch accepted the death of the gods and saw no hope for sustaining what those gods had once sustained.
For an excellent analysis of Krutch's career and his writings, see Peter Gregg Slater, "The Negative Secularism of The Modern Temper: Joseph Wood Krutch," American Quarterly 33 (summer 1981): 185-205.
The naturalist Joseph Wood Krutch similarly anticipated both Abbey's and Hardin's views.