Joseph of Arimathea


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Related to Joseph of Arimathea: Mary Magdalene, Nicodemus

Joseph of Arimathea

Saint New Testament a wealthy member of the Sanhedrin, who obtained the body of Jesus after the Crucifixion and laid it in his own tomb (Matthew 27:57--60). Feast day: Mar. 17 or July 31
References in periodicals archive ?
The third and final scene is at the foot of the Cross where, along with Joseph of Arimathea, another Pharisee, they take the dead body of Christ down from the Cross to bury him.
There, Mary and John stand weeping at either side, each holding one of the Lord's hands, while Joseph of Arimathea, atop a ladder, gently cradles Christ's upper body while an assistant--equipped with some alarming-looking pincers extracts the single nail that had pierced both his feet.
Shakespeare's treatment of Sir William Lucy recalls the story of one such character, Joseph of Arimathea, who removed Jesus from the cross to bury him.
A window such as The Crucifixion and Deposition with the Virgin Mary, St John, St Joseph of Arimathea and St Longinus with Scenes from the Entombment and the Passion (1922; Fig.
Mr Phillips' theory is based on scriptures that describe Mary spending her final days with an unnamed disciple of Jesus - the author believes the man was Joseph of Arimathea.
The Jewish intellectuals Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus accepted Jesus as Messiah.
GILLESPIE Donal Former Parish Priest of St Joseph of Arimathea Church, Pyle.
According to Arthurian legend, the Grail was brought to Britain by Joseph of Arimathea, who buried it at Chalice Well, near the foot of Glastonbury Tor, causing waters which bestow eternal youth to spring forth.
The Nanteos Cup, an ancient wooden chalice, was rumoured to have been carried over to Britain by Joseph of Arimathea, years after the crucifixion of Christ.
It has long been said throughout the region that Jesus and his great-uncle, tin trader Joseph of Arimathea, arrived soon after the biblical account of the twelve-year-old Christ in the Jerusalem temple.
It seems to me, however, that what Grimm observes is properly a biblical paradigm and fully deserves that appellation, whereas the association between King Pelles and Joseph of Arimathea that Besserman notes by way of extending Grimm's insight is merely an allusion.