Josephus


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Josephus

Flavius . real name Joseph ben Matthias. ?37--?100 ad, Jewish historian and general; author of History of the Jewish War and Antiquities of the Jews
References in periodicals archive ?
Josefo menciona um hipodromo em Damasco no primeiro seculo AEC (Josephus 1998: 13.389).
"Josephus reported that the king had upgraded Bethsaida from a village into a polis, a proper city," Mordechai Aviam, from Kinneret College, told Haaretz.
Marciak begins by presenting an exegesis of Josephus's conversion story of Helena and her son King Izates of Adiabene.
The Judeo-Roman historian Flavius Josephus constitutes the bulk of Jewish historical source material outside of the Christian Testament.
Josephus quotes Manetho in his work Contra Apion in order to discredit Manetho's version of the Exodus.
In combing through Josephus's Jewish War, Jewish Antiquities, and Life, Root takes his methodological cues from scholars such as Steve Mason and Shaye J.
For example, when the teetotaling Daniels ordered navy ships to serve coffee instead of alcohol, he failed to see that hard-drinking sailors would disparage his decision, even deriding a cup of coffee as "a cup of Josephus Daniels" or, more simply, a "cup of Joe" (p.
Morrison's Josephus Daniels: The Small-d Democrat [1966] as the standard study of an individual whose name regularly appears in books on his era but whose influence was often shadowy and whose personal life was poorly understood.
A University of Huddersfield historian is now researching the extraordinary episode of World War I Belgian refugees who came to Britain and has helped the descendents of Josephus - including his granddaughter Elsie - to explore places he knew during his exile.
Ranging down through the halls of history from Homer and Hesiod, to Sophocles, Plato, and Aristotle, to Philon of Larissa and Cicero of Rome, to Josephus, Plutarch and Justinian, to Dante Aligheiri, William of Ockham, and Petrarch, to Leonardo Da Vinci, Martin Luther, and Copernicus, to Queen Elizabeth, William Shakespeare, and Locke, and so many more, we are treated to a wealth of historical personalities, their lives, accomplishments and influences.
Since the time of Julius Caesar, the Jews had enjoyed some favour from Rome, most significantly including religious liberty: while the claim that Judaism was recognised as a religio licita under Roman law is not by any means indisputable, there is enough evidence to suggest, as Pucci Ben Zeev concludes in her work on the documents quoted by Josephus, 'that the same policy was implemented by Augustus toward all the Jews, no matter where they lived', and this policy was of general religious liberty.
It is commonly accepted that Jesus Christ was born either before 4 BC (working from references in Matthew, Flavius Josephus) or after AD 6 (working from information in Luke).