Joule heat

Joule heat

[′jül ‚hēt]
(electricity)
The heat which is evolved when current flows through a medium having electrical resistance, as given by Joule's law.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, Joule heat density produced in conventional long carbon fibres (i.
The Joule heat density (Q) produced by a DC current is:
As a consequence the temperature of the cable can be relatively high even for moderate values of the Joule heat produced in the cable as compared to the same cable in air with natural convection cooling.
In every cable i a certain amount of Joule heat is produced denoted with pi (W/m).
The generated joule heat is the heat source for cooking.
A typical situation is under-loading LEA (steady current value below the rated current) and an atmosphere with temperatures below 0[degrees]C, in the presence of wind, the Joule heat developed in the current conduction process leading to a temperature lower than the hoar-frost formation temperature (about -5[degrees]C).
The heat transfer module governs the joule heat distribution as given in (1)
By resistance heating this term corresponds to the Joule heat computed by electric analysis.
On the other hand, the temperature field is influenced by the Joule heat generation.
Phase change memory is a type of nonvolatile memory that exploits two-phase changes in electrical resistance of a film caused by Joule heat, which is generated by a current -- an amorphous state3 (high resistance) and a crystalline state (low resistance).
Phase-change memory, a type of nonvolatile memory that can be programmed and read, employs Joule heat generated by current and makes use of the difference in the electrical resistance of a film when in an amorphous state*2 (high resistance) and when in a crystalline state (low resistance).