journeyman

(redirected from Journeymen)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

journeyman

1. a craftsman, artisan, etc., who is qualified to work at his trade in the employment of another
2. a competent workman
3. (formerly) a worker hired on a daily wage

Journeyman

A craftsperson who has finished apprenticeship in a trade and qualifies for wages, but remains employed by others.

Journeyman

 

in the medieval guild system, an artisan who did not have his own shop but worked for hire for a master, that is, a full member of a guild. At first, most journeymen became masters themselves after a few years of service. However, beginning in the 14th century, and especially in the 15th and 16th centuries, it became increasingly difficult for a journeyman to become a master, owing to growing stratification in the artisan milieu and the desire to limit admission of new members to the guilds. Barriers to admission included an upward revision of the property requirement for those seeking to become masters, as well as an increase in the dues that had to be paid to the guild treasury. Journeyman status gradually became permanent; journeymen were transformed in fact into wageworkers and were exploited more severely. All this resulted in an exacerbation of the struggle between masters and journeymen, the latter banding together in associations such as the compagnonnages in France.

journeyman

A person who has successfully served a formal apprenticeship in a building trade or craft and who is thereby qualified to work at that trade in another’s employ. A journeyman’s license (earned through a combination of education, supervised experience, and examination) is required in many locales for those employed at an intermediate level in certain trades, such as plumbing, mechanical work, and electrical work.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quiz question: We've teamed up with Sports Book of the Month & have a copy of Journeymen to give away.
His study paints a narrow, individualistic worldview of journeymen that diverges from Sean Wilentz's classic Chants Democratic, which more convincingly shows how ideas of solidarity, class interest, and republicanism led workers to collective actions, unions, and political parties.
72) Their visible presence within the industrial community provided a powerful symbol of craft mobility for journeymen and apprentices, and the mentoring process offered by craft culture would provide practical means of "masculine independence" for a large majority of journeymen artisans and craftsworkers.
In the second half of the book, the author argues that the background of masters, their close shop-floor contact with and mentoring of their employees, and the ambitions of journeymen for self-employment inspired a culture of "master-man mutualism.
In many ways, the novel is a coming-of-age story for the innocent Jersey, as he is exposed to the journeymen but then becomes his own journeyman, weathered by a mess of ordeals and mishaps.
As part of their training, journeymen, attired in traditionally antiquated garb, must travel the country on foot for three years, relying on both the kindness of strangers and their own skills to survive.
Membership in the MAC Council of New Jersey is open to all labor unions representing journeymen and women and apprentices who are employed by union contractors.
Hopefully a new Mystik Journeymen will be hitting y'all.
Surely sooner or later someone is going to sit up and take notice and realise that we are not just a bunch of journeymen.
Moreover, that theory, with its central concept of a hierarchy of workers, derived force from its basis in the actual ability of masters to exploit the labour of journeymen and apprentices.
75 an hour over the term of the contract for journeymen meatcutters, and 1.
Sonenscher also contends that his interpretation elucidates popular responses to the French Revolution of 1789, insofar as journeymen again asserted their legal rights as producers in listing tbeir grievances; this point merits further development.