Joy loader

Joy loader

[′jȯi ¦lōd·ər]
(mining engineering)
A loading machine which uses mechanical arms to collect coal or ore onto an apron that is pushed onto the broken material.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1922 his invention, the Joy Loader, brought coal operators more tons per miner, gave the miners more income per hours worked and provided the consumer with reduced fuel costs.
He then describes the development of cutting and loading machinery in the early twentieth century, culminating in the Joy Loader. The percentage of coal mechanically cut increased from 25 percent in 1900 to 88 percent in 1940; the percentage mechanically loaded grew from 0 to 35 percent in the same period.
The new Joy loader was only one of dozens of different machines being developed and pressed into service.
Joy said that the only knowledge he had was from an operator in West Virginia who claimed that he could load with his Joy loader at about 30c.
The company turned to large Thew shovels working in conjunction with Joy loaders. They "earned their keep" during the first six months of the year, said Eugene McAuliffe, president of the company in an October 30, 1924, article.