Joy

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Joy

(language)
A functional programming language by Manfred von Thun. Joy is unusual because it is not based on lambda calculus, but on the composition of functions. Functions take a stack as argument, consume any number of parameters from it, and return it with any number of results on it. The concatenation of programs denotes the composition of functions. One of the datatypes of Joy is that of quoted programs, of which lists are a special case.

Joy Home.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

Joy

See also Gaiety, Happiness.
Auteb
female personification of gladness. [Egypt. Myth.: Jobes, 159]
blue bird, the
symbolizes happiness sought by two poor children. [Belg. Lit.: The Blue Bird; Haydn & Fuller, 94]
cinquefoil
indicates gladness. [Flower Symbolism and Heraldry: Jobes, 341]
Euphrosyne
one of Graces; name means ‘festivity.’ [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 96]
gold on red
symbol of felicity and joy. [Chinese Art: Jobes, 357]
Hathor
cow-headed goddess of joy and love. [Egypt. Myth.: Leach, 484]
Hyperboreans
blissful race lived beyond the North Wind in a region of perpetual Spring. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 476]
myrrh
symbol of gladness. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 176]
red on green
symbol of felicity and joy. [Chinese Art: Jobes, 357]
Rubaiyat, The
series of poems celebrating hedonism as a way of life. [Br. Poetry: Benét, 881]
wood sorrel
indicates gladness. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 177]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hartnell-Young, E., Harrison, C., Crook, C., Pemberton, R., Joyes, G., Fisher, T., & Davies, L.
(11) Kaley Joyes sees this in gendered terms, arguing, "the Smiths' shared happiness about the hat demonstrates the potential benefits of destabilizing gender roles, as Woolf shows individual happiness to be contingent on a balance between relationship with others and individual wholeness" (76).
why should our afflictions here, have so much power or boldness as to oppose the hope of our Joyes hereafter." Nice, then, but strong.
Lobzowska, Maria 1963 "Two English translations of the 15th century French satire Les quinze joyes de manage", Kwartalnik Neofilologiczny 10: 17-32.
(1.31-36) My sorowes waxe, my joyes are in the wayning, My hope decayes, and my despayre is springing, My love hath losse, and my disgrace hath gayning, Wrong rules, desert with teares her hands sits wringing: Sorrow, despayre, disgrace, and wrong, doe thwart My Joy, my love, my hope, and my desert.
Two West Australian men, Timothy Britten and Richard Joyes, were awarded the Cross of Valour for their efforts to rescue those in the Sari club.
Heritiers d'une longue tradition de debats theologiques et sociaux sur la nature et le sacrement du mariage, une tradition qui va des Peres de l'Eglise aux deliberations allegoriques (telles que Le Miroir de mariage d'Eustache Deschamps) et farcesques (telles que, par exemple, les Quinze Joyes de mariage) de la fin du Moyen Age, les deux reformateurs s'etaient deja fortement attaques au probleme: Erasme dans des traites importants (L'Institution du mariage chretien et la Louange du mariage) et dans certains de ses colloques (entre autres Le Pretendant et sa belle, Le Mariage, La Vierge qui hait le mariage), et Rabelais notamment dans le Tiers Livre.
The Shirleian introduction to 'Fifteen Joys' reads; 'Lo my lordes and ladyes, here begynnen the fyfftene joyes of oure Lady, cleped the xv Ooes, translated out of Frenshe into Englisshe by daun John the Monke of Bury at th'instance of the worshipfull Pryncesse Isabelle, nowe Countasse of Warre lady Despenser.' The whole poem is edited by MacCracken, I, 260-67.
She urges the Countess, "from whose desires did spring this worke of Grace" (12), to think of the time which she, Lanyer, and Anne once spent at this Berkshire estate as a type of the pleasure to be experienced fully in heaven: "Vouchsafe to thinke upon those pleasures past, / As fleeting worldly Joyes that could not last: / Or, as dimme shadowes of celestiall pleasures, / Which are desir'd above all earthly treasures" (13-16).