Juan Fernández

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Juan Fernández

(hwän fārnän`dās), group of small islands, S Pacific, c.400 mi (640 km) W of Valparaiso, Chile. They belong to Chile and are constitutionally a special territory; they are administered as a part of Valparaiso prov. The two principal islands are Isla Robinson Crusoe (formerly Más a Tierra) and Isla Alejandro Selkirk (formerly Más Afuera); they acquired their present names in 1966. Volcanic in origin, they have a pleasant climate and are rugged and largely wooded. Robinson Crusoe is the only inhabited island. The chief occupation is lobster fishing. Discovered by the Spanish navigator Juan Fernández in 1563, the islands achieved fame with the publication of Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe (1719), generally acknowledged to have been inspired by the confinement on Más a Tierra (1704–9) of Alexander SelkirkSelkirk, Alexander
, 1676–1721, Scottish sailor whose adventures suggested to Daniel Defoe the story of Robinson Crusoe (1719). In 1704, as a sailing master, Selkirk quarreled with the captain of his ship in the Juan Fernández islands and asked to be put
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, a Scottish sailor. Occupied by the Spanish in 1750, the islands passed to Chile upon its independence. In the 19th cent., Isla Robinson Crusoe was a penal colony. The islands are now a national park, and a marine reserve protects more than 100,000 sq mi (260,000 sq km) of the surrounding waters.

Juan Fernández

 

a group of volcanic islands belonging to Chile; located in the Pacific Ocean, 450 km west of the South American coast. The islands have an area of 185 sq km and a maximum elevation of 1,650 m. The climate is subtropical, and the vegetation features evergreen forests (with many endemic species) and abundant ferns. There are meadows in leeward areas. Economic activities include fishing and cattle raising.

It is probable that the Juan Fernández Islands were a source of inspiration to D. Defoe; for that reason the largest island, Isla Más a Tierra, is also known as Isla Róbinson Crusoe.

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In this study, we report for the first time the presence of the family Orbiniidae in the Juan Fernandez Archipelago and we describe a new species of the genus Scoloplos, S.
Milne Edwards, 1837) is an endemic species of the Juan Fernandez archipelago (~33[degrees] 46' S, 78[degrees] 47' W; Robinson Crusoe, Santa Clara, and Alejandro Selkirk Islands) and the Desventuradas Islands (San Felix y San Ambrosio; ~6[degrees] 20' S, 79[degrees] 53' W).
Comments: This species is restricted to Juan Fernandez Archipelago.
The Municipality of Juan Fernandez Archipelago signed a legal contract with the University, permitting the realization of this project.
pallidus from the NE Atlantic; the present study extends this range to the SE Pacific coast, and specifically to the seamounts near the Juan Fernandez Archipelago to depths between about 300 and 500 m, thus broadly extending the geographic range of this species.
The Juan Fernandez Archipelago (= Robinson Crusoe Islands, V Region Valparaiso, Prov.
Robinson Crusoe Island is part of the Juan Fernandez Archipelago, which consists of three islands.
We chose the Juan Fernandez Archipelago flora for a comprehensive study for a number of reasons.
In the case of Victoria Slavuski's clever novel, Musica para olvidar una isla, the displacement is from the urban centers of recent Latin American sociopolitical history (specifically, Santiago de Chile, although the author is Argentine) to the Juan Fernandez Archipelago, virtually unknown by name but legendary as the castaway abode of Robinson Crusoe.
In the southeastern Pacific Ocean, Chile has four island territories of the highest interest to science and other fields, due to their geographic location, geological formation and isolation: Easter Island, Salas y Gomez Island, the Desventuradas Islands (San Felix Island and San Ambrosio Island), and the Juan Fernandez Archipelago. They are of volcanic origin and represent the emerged peaks of seamounts that form part of the Salas y Gomez and Nazca ranges on the Nazca tectonic plate.
Meanwhile, the Juan Fernandez Archipelago (made up of the Robinson Crusoe, Alejandro Selkirk and Santa Clara islands) are 600 km from continental Chile.
The Juan Fernandez Archipelago (33[degrees]37'S, 78[degrees]51'W) is a group of three geologically young islands (Robinson Crusoe, Santa Clara, and Alejandro Selkirk), with an estimated age of six million years.