Montañes, Juan Martínez

(redirected from Juan Martinez Montanes)

Montañes, Juan Martínez

(hwän märtē`nĕth mōntä`nyās), c.1568–1649, Spanish sculptor. He was known for his polychrome figures in wood. Most of his work was done for the churches and convents of Seville, where it still remains. Among his finest works are his highly spiritual and dignified interpretations of the Crucifixion and of the Immaculate Conception (cathedral, Seville). His work influenced the art of Velázquez and of Zurbarán.
References in periodicals archive ?
De Urbina identifies Granada and Seville as the most important schools, and includes, alongside de Mena and Cano, Juan Martinez Montanes (1568-1649) and Jose de Mora (1642-1724) as masters of the form.
En Sevilla quien resplandece de manera excepcional es Juan Martinez Montanes (1568-1649), <<asombro de los siglos presentes y admiracion de los por venir>>, a quien se le ha llegado incluso a adjudicar el epiteto de <<Dios de la madera>>.
Pages 74-193 of the catalogue contain detailed analyses of thirty-five individual works, both paintings and sculptures, beginning with Velazquez's portrait of the sculptor Juan Martinez Montanes, several of whose statues were among those on display, particularly the superb St.
As well as Diego Velazquez's well-known painting (part of the National Gallery's permanent collection), there was a magnificent sculpture by Juan Martinez Montanes, with the drapes of Mary's blue and gold cloak so exquisitely carved and painted that one longed to reach out and touch.
The text explains in deadpan detail that the portrait fascinates Cruz because Velazquez did not finish painting the bust on which the sculptor, Juan Martinez Montanes, is shown working.
In between the two is a polychrome sculpture by Juan Martinez Montanes (painted by Pacheco).
Escultura conocida como El Nino Cautivo de Juan Martinez Montanes, que fue recibido con grandes muestras de devota alegria por el publico que pudo contemplarlo <<de cerca>>.
Few outside the Spanish-speaking world are familiar with the work of, say, sculptors Juan Martinez Montanes or Juan de Mesa, yet they rivalled Velazquez or Alonso Cano in reputation--and deservedly so.
One of the revelations of this first exhibition in the UK to combine Spanish baroque sculpture and painting--aside from the transcendent artistry of such sculptors as Juan Martinez Montanes and Juan de Mesa--is the close interaction that existed between the media.