Zumárraga, Juan de

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Zumárraga, Juan de

(hwän dā tho͞omä`rägä), 1468–1548, Spanish churchman, first bishop of Mexico, a Franciscan. Going to Mexico in 1528, he became prominent in governmental affairs and opposed Nuño de GuzmánGuzmán, Nuño de
, or Núñez Beltrán de Guzmán
, d. 1544, Spanish conquistador. After serving as governor of Panuco in NE Mexico, he became president of the first audiencia of New Spain (1528).
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 and the audienciaaudiencia
, royal court of justice in Spain and the Spanish Empire, varying greatly in its form and function but having some administrative as well as judicial capacity. Use of the term also extended to the court's jurisdictional area.
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. He was officially made protector of the indigenous peoples and exerted strenuous efforts to convert them and to end human sacrifice. In his zeal to bring Spanish civilization to them, however, he destroyed valuable native manuscripts and remains. He was important in founding the college of Santa Cruz de Tlaltelolco for the education of the indigenous people. A close friend and assistant of Viceroy Antonio de MendozaMendoza, Antonio de
, 1490?–1552, Spanish administrator, first viceroy of New Spain (1535–50) and viceroy of Peru (1551–52). Of noble family, Mendoza held high offices before going to Mexico, where his wise rule earned him the appellation "the good viceroy.
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, he helped to improve conditions in New Spain. Zumárraga was instrumental in bringing the first printing press to the New World and wrote religious manuals that were among the early products of the press.
References in periodicals archive ?
To convince the unbelieving bishop, Fray Juan de Zumarraga, Our Lady instructed St.
And Lorenz Martinez (as Archbishop Juan de Zumarraga) and Kuya Manzano (Governor Nuno Beltran de Guzman) are responsible for the musical's most entertaining, scenery-chewing exchanges.
El primer taller que se instituyo en la ciudad de Mexico en 1539, estuvo promovido por el virrey don Antonio de Mendoza y el primer obispo Fray Juan de Zumarraga, quienes, a escasos 18 anos de que la conquista de Mexico hubiera sido consumada, consiguieron que se estableciera en la Gran Tenochtitlan el editor Juan Pablos Lombardo, un oficial del famoso impresor aleman de Sevilla, Juan Cromberger.