Jubilus


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Jubilus

 

in liturgical singing, an exalted, ornamented improvisation. In Gregorian chant, jubili were sung by soloists on the last syllable of the word “alleluia.” They were borrowed by the Christian church from Hebrew liturgical music. In order to facilitate memorization, the monk Notker Balbulus (A.D. 830–912) of the Abbey of St. Gallen arranged jubili in such a way that each syllable of the text corresponded to a note. This was the origin of the liturgical sequence.

References in periodicals archive ?
Luython was evidently in touch with Barthold long before the collection was published, as his works also include a 1587 print bearing the title Popularis anni jubilus, which contains music set to Barthold's texts based on popular traditional subjects.
The theologian and future Pope Innocent III wrote that the jubilus of song, or the shout for joy, is considered "above the power of words to communicate meaning," a rather astonishing assertion (p.
Jubilus Musicus / per / Jubilaei Andencensis / Festivam Octavavam / Concentu Harmaniaco / Personam / sive / Missae VIII / Solennes / in / Augsburg, Mathias Rieger 1756.
From Jubilus to Learned Exegesis: New Liturgical Poetry in Twelfth-Century Nevers', Iversen's second paper, examines new liturgical poetry from the twelfth century, relying on the texts in the Nevers manuscript.
Of the jubilus, the melisma at the end of the chanted "alleluia," he writes: "For whom is such a jubilation suitable, unless to an ineffable Being?
There are one or two straight examinations of lesser-known mystics - Beatrice of Nazareth, for example - and constant comparison of different writers in attempts to understand and illuminate: St Augustine's jubilus and Rolle's canor as reflecting different ideas on the importance of music in religion; Augustinian views on visions and their reflection in Mechthild von Magdeburg; Aelred of Rievaulx's De Spirituali Amicitia and the Cloud of Unknowing.
Geerlings reviews the early Christian sentiments regarding anniversaries; Ziegler acquaints the 'Jubiland' with the origins of the Jubilus in Carolingian liturgy.