Jubilus


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Jubilus

 

in liturgical singing, an exalted, ornamented improvisation. In Gregorian chant, jubili were sung by soloists on the last syllable of the word “alleluia.” They were borrowed by the Christian church from Hebrew liturgical music. In order to facilitate memorization, the monk Notker Balbulus (A.D. 830–912) of the Abbey of St. Gallen arranged jubili in such a way that each syllable of the text corresponded to a note. This was the origin of the liturgical sequence.

References in periodicals archive ?
The theologian and future Pope Innocent III wrote that the jubilus of song, or the shout for joy, is considered "above the power of words to communicate meaning," a rather astonishing assertion (p.
Jubilus Musicus / per / Jubilaei Andencensis / Festivam Octavavam / Concentu Harmaniaco / Personam / sive / Missae VIII / Solennes / in / Augsburg, Mathias Rieger 1756.
Payne also includes the chants for the two instances where Latin 15181/82 supplies a prosa (the texted repetition of the jubilus in the Alleluia) for the relevant responsory.