Jude


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Jude,

epistle of the New Testament, the next to last book of the Bible. The Jude who wrote it has been identified since ancient times with St. Jude the apostle, but most modern scholars deny the identity and date the letter as late as A.D. 100. It is called a Catholic (or General) Epistle, but it is clearly intended for a particular audience, which it warns against some heresy that led to immorality. The dangers are shown from Old Testament examples. The book contains references to Jewish apocryphal books, Enoch and the Assumption of Moses. It ends with a doxology. Jude has a close literary relationship with Second PeterPeter,
two letters of the New Testament, classified among the Catholic (or General) Epistles. Each opens with a statement of authorship by the apostle St. Peter. First Peter, the longer book, is addressed from "Babylon" to the Christians of the churches of Asia Minor.
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Jude

“the other Judas, not Iscariot.” [N.T.: John 14:22]

Jude

1. a book of the New Testament (in full The Epistle of Jude)
2. Saint the author of this, stated to be the brother of James (Jude 1) and almost certainly identical with Thaddaeus (Matthew 10:2--4). Feast day: Oct. 28 or June 19
References in periodicals archive ?
Jude Hope in the Hamptons, families never receive a bill from St.
Jude offers housing in Memphis, transportation to and from the hospital, and meals for the patient and one parent.
Jude has watched hungry bass become flummoxed by the gobies' seemingly erratic activity.
Jude quickly gained national attention, and the Claretians soon began to adopt innovative ways to meet distant worshipers' needs.
All the same, Jude preferred the bracing wind to the too-close air of the station's waiting room, heavy with cigarette smoke, diesel fumes, and damp wool.
Second, devotion to Saint Jude has persisted over centuries despite the fact that so little is known about his life.