Julia


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Julia,

feminine name in the Julian gens. 1 Died 54 B.C., daughter of Julius CaesarCaesar, Julius
(Caius Julius Caesar), 100? B.C.–44 B.C., Roman statesman and general. Rise to Power

Although he was born into the Julian gens, one of the oldest patrician families in Rome, Caesar was always a member of the democratic or popular party.
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 and wife of PompeyPompey
(Cnaeus Pompeius Magnus) , 106 B.C.–48 B.C., Roman general, the rival of Julius Caesar. Sometimes called Pompey the Great, he was the son of Cnaeus Pompeius Strabo (consul in 89 B.C.), a commander of equivocal reputation.
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. By her grace and tact she maintained the bond between her father and her husband. After her death the two statesmen became open enemies. 2 39 B.C.–A.D. 14, daughter of AugustusAugustus
, 63 B.C.–A.D. 14, first Roman emperor, a grandson of the sister of Julius Caesar. Named at first Caius Octavius, he became on adoption by the Julian gens (44 B.C.) Caius Julius Caesar Octavianus (Octavian); Augustus was a title of honor granted (27 B.C.
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 and wife, in turn, of Marcus Claudius Marcellus (d. 23 B.C.; see under MarcellusMarcellus
, principal plebeian family of the ancient Roman gens Claudia. Marcus Claudius Marcellus, c.268–208 B.C., was consul five times. In his first consulship he fought (222) against the Insubrian Gauls and killed their king in single combat.
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), Marcus Vipsanius AgrippaAgrippa, Marcus Vipsanius
, c.63 B.C.–12 B.C., Roman general. A close friend of Octavian (later Emperor Augustus), he won a name in the wars in Gaul before becoming consul in 37 B.C. He organized Octavian's fleet and is generally given much credit for the defeat (36 B.C.
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, and TiberiusTiberius
(Tiberius Julius Caesar Augustus) , 42 B.C.–A.D. 37, second Roman emperor (A.D. 14–A.D. 37). He was the son of Tiberius Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla and was originally named Tiberius Claudius Nero. He campaigned (20 B.C.) in Armenia, became (19 B.C.
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. Her infidelities caused her banishment by Augustus to Pandataria (Ventotene) Island in the Tyrrhenian Sea. Soon after Tiberius became emperor, she died of starvation. 3 18 B.C.–A.D. 28, daughter of Julia and Agrippa (see above); wife of Lucius Aemilius Paullus. Because of her licentious conduct, she was banished by Augustus to the island of Tremerus off the coast of Apulia, where she died.

Julia

masks self as page. [Br. Lit.: Two Gentlemen of Verona]

Julia

A programming language designed for numerical and financial computing. Julia is used for financial analysis in banking, insurance, commodity trading and risk analysis. Introduced in 2012, Julia is a multi-paradigm language, which means programmers can use functional, procedural and object-oriented techniques. See programming language.
References in classic literature ?
Charles Weston was a distant relative of the good aunt, and was, like Julia, an orphan, who was moderately endowed with the goods of fortune.
Whatever might be the composure of the maiden aunt, while Julia was weeping in her chamber over the long separation that was now to exist between herself and her friend, young Weston by no means displayed the same philosophic indifference.
"It is for Anna Miller," said Julia with a flush of feeling.
I mean nothing disrespectful to yourself, dear aunt," continued Julia. "You know how much I owe to you, and ought to know that I love you as a mother."
"Why, nothing is easier, dear aunt!" said Julia with animation.
This sounded exceedingly liberal--to ask ONLY $100 for that for which there was a sort of moral obligation to ask $120!--and Julia having come out with the intent to throw away a hundred-dollar note that her mother had given her that morning, the bargain was concluded.
"Now, I hope you are happy, Julia," quietly observed Mary Warren, as the two girls took their seats side by side in Mrs.
Julia blushed when her friend said "in town," and her conscious feelings immediately conjured up the image of a certain Betts Shoreham, as the person in her companion's mind's eye.
"I am not afraid of her in most things," rejoined Julia, "but I confess I am in all that relates to taste; particularly in what relates to extravagance."
Crawford, approaching Julia, said, "I hope I am not to lose my companion, unless she is afraid of the evening air in so exposed a seat." The request had not been foreseen, but was very graciously received, and Julia's day was likely to end almost as well as it began.
In the midst of the demonstration, Magdalen quietly made her first entrance, as "Julia." She was dressed very plainly in dark colors, and wore her own hair; all stage adjuncts and alterations
Before the actress of the evening had been five minutes on the stage, Norah detected, to her own indescribable astonishment, that Magdalen had audaciously individualized the feeble amiability of "Julia's" character, by seizing no less a person than herself as the model to act it by.